Physics

 
B.S. MajorMinor

Physics is all about discovery, not only discovering how the world works, but also discovering your passion for the conceptual and quantitative aspects of physical science. By studying physics, you will gain a scientific foundation through a variety of interactive labs, lectures and classwork to make you a professional in the field.

Concordia’s physics program prepares you to pursue careers and graduate degrees in a variety of disciplines, from astronomy to engineering to computer science. Research programs and internship experience help you develop real-world skills and find the specialized field in which you will excel.

Graduate cap

90%
of alums are in professional or graduate school or employed in the health or science industry within 5 months of graduation

Physics Sample Academic Outcomes

 

Careers

  • Physics Teacher
  • Osteopathic Physician

Graduate Schools

  • Georgia Institute of Technology
  • University of Colorado - Denver
  • U.S. Navy Nuclear Propulsion Candidacy Program
  • University of Akron
  • University of Central Missouri

Physics Faculty

Physics Student and Alumni Reviews

Concordia University is focused on providing an exceptional experience and we ask our students to provide feedback on all aspects of their student experience. The ratings and comments below are from our annual survey of all graduating seniors regarding their experience in the Physics program, the academic department and the university.

 
 

A Space for Science

Human Anatomy

Concordia has a dedicated gross anatomy lab to help you train for a vocation in the health sciences and forensic science by performing autopsies, analyzing findings, and communicating diagnostic conclusions.

Scene of the Crime

At 545 Grand Avenue, there is a crime scene house to aid your study of forensic science experiments, demonstrations, and training. It’s a chance to get real-world, hands-on training of what it means to investigate a crime.

On the Prairie

Concordia has a dedicated area of prairie for training and research in ecology and other biological sciences, giving you the opportunity to study native plants, animals, and insects in their natural environment.

Eyes on the Sky

The Osten Observatory at Concordia University houses a computer-controlled telescope with different eyepieces and filters that allow you to view and study the stars and planets.

Under the Microscope

A phase-contrast microscope and molecular modeling software let you work on a cellular level, performing quantum calculations and molecular modeling of proteins, DNA, nanomolecules, polymers, and liquids.

Medicine on a Mission
Medicine on a Mission

As a student at Concordia, you will have the opportunity to participate in medical mission trips and to places like Belize, Costa Rica, and Guatemala. You can work in medical clinics, host health fairs, and share your faith through ministry programs.

Present Your Findings
Present Your Findings

Each spring, Concordia hosts the Concordia University Research Symposium. The symposium gives you the opportunity to present your personal research or project in either oral or poster presentation format.

Learning to Soar
Learning to Soar

Fontenelle Forest’s Raptor Recovery Center is an organization that rehabilitates injured raptors. Students at Concordia can not only visit and tour the treatment center, but assist with educational programs, special events, or as part of the network that protects and restores raptors to their natural habitat.

Physics Sample Course Schedule

Semester 1

  •  
    Phys 111 General Physics I
    4
    Lecture 3, Lab. 2. Experiments, lectures and discussions to reveal the sensibleness of nature via mechanics of particles and waves as models, relativity and conservation laws, momentum and energy, and the nature of scientific inquiry.
  •  
    Chem 115 General Chemistry*
    4
    Lecture 3, Lab. 3. General principles of chemistry: atoms and molecules, chemical reactions and reaction stoichiometry, phases of matter, electronic structure, bonding, molecular shapes, and intermolecular forces.
  •  
    Gen Ed 10 Credit Hours
    10

Semester 2

  •  
    Phys 112 General Physics II
    4
    Lecture 3, Lab. 2. Continuation of Phys 111 with special emphasis on electricity and magnetism, light, and relativity and their relation to conservation principles and current scientific explanation.
  •  
    Chem 116 General Inorganic and Qualitative Analysis*
    4
    Lecture 3, Lab. 3. A continuation of general chemistry: chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction chemistry, and fundamental qualitative analysis.
  •  
    Gen Ed 10 Credit Hours
    10

Semester 3

  •  
    Phys 211 General Physics I Calculus Topics
    1
    Lecture 1. A calculus-based treatment of topics covered in Phys 111. Enrollment in Phys 211 and Phys 111 is equivalent to taking a calculus-based general physics course.
  •  
    Phys 321 Introductory Mechanics
    3
    Lecture 3. Calculus treatment of the motion of particles and rigid bodies using Newtonian force methods: non-inertial reference frames, classical mechanics, relativistic laws of motion of a particle.
  •  
    Math 184 Calculus I
    4
    A beginning course in the analysis of functions including analytic geometry. A study of limits, techniques and applications of differentiation, basic integration and transcendental functions.
  •  
    Gen Ed 8 Credit Hours
    8

Semester 4

  •  
    Phys 212 General Physics II Calculus Topics
    1
    Lecture 1. A calculus-based treatment of topics covered in Phys 112. Enrollment in Phys 212 and Phys 112 is equivalent to taking a calculus-based general physics course.
  •  
    Phys 353 Thermodynamics
    3
    See Chem 353.
  •  
    CS 141 Computer Programming II
    3
    Continued development of discipline in program design, writing, testing and debugging with C++ as the high level programming language. Algorithms to be studied include internal sorting and searching methods, string processing, and the manipulation of data structures: arrays, stacks, queues, and linked lists.
  •  
    Gen Ed 9 Credit Hours
    9

Semester 5

  •  
    Phys 371 Electronics
    3
    Laboratory approach to the study of integrated circuits and transistors. Classroom component for supporting theory.
  •  
    Math 186 Calculus II
    4
    A continuation of Calculus I. Topics studied include integration, analytical geometry and vectors in twodimensional space, and techniques of integration.
  •  
    Math 322 Foundations of Statistics
    3
    A study of mathematical statistics including probability distributions sampling theory, point estimation, methods of correlation and regression, and the principles of statistical inference.
  •  
    Gen Ed 3 Credit Hours
    3

Semester 6

  •  
    Phys 381 Modern Physics
    3
    Lecture 3. Physics of the 20th century. Relativity, the wave–particle duality, atomic models, the quantum theory.
  •  
    Phys 382 Advanced Physics Lab. I, II, III
    1
    Lab. 3. Selected experiments in modern physics requiring library research.
  •  
    Math 284 Calculus III
    4
    A continuation of Calculus II. A study of analytic geometry in three dimensional space, partial differentiation, multiple integration and infinite series.
  •  
    Gen Ed 8 Credit Hours
    8

Semester 7

  •  
    Phys 383 Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics
    3
    Study of nuclear radiations, nuclear structure and models, and the energetics of sub-atomic particle interactions.
  •  
    Phys 390 Electricity and Magnetism
    3
    Study of electrical and magnetic phenomena and their understanding through models and formulation.
  •  
    Math 384 Differential Equations
    3
    A study of ordinary differential equations, first and higher order, systems linear and non-linear, their solutions and applications, including La Place Transforms.
  •  
    Gen Ed 6 Credit Hours
    6

Semester 8

  •  
    Phys 399 Research in Physics
    2
    Capstone course in physics. Students perform supervised independent research in physics, and also learn about issues related to the profession.
  •  
    CS 131 Computer Programming I
    3
    The development of skill in translating problems into algorithms and implementing these algorithms into a high-level programming language. An emphasis will be placed on good programming style including structured programming techniques. An overview of the organization and operation of a computer system will be given.
  •  
    Chem 231 Organic Chemistry I*
    4
    Lecture 3, Lab. 3. The compounds of the aliphatic and aromatic series, stressing general principles. The basic understandings in this area, an appreciation of the relation of organic chemistry to daily life.
  •  
    Gen Ed 6 Credit Hours
    6