BSN Nursing
Courses

149 credit hours
100% career outcome rate
1 degree option

NursingFeatured Courses

As a student in the nursing major at Concordia Nebraska, you’ll have the opportunity to take specialized courses related to various aspects of the nursing profession. These classes, designed to equip you for leadership and service in various nursing careers, are taught by some of our esteemed faculty who have extensive experience in their fields.

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NursingSample Schedule of Courses

The following sample course of study is an example of the sequence of courses you might take in order to receive your degree. Please plan to discuss your actual course of study with your advisor, who can help you stay on track to meet your academic and professional goals.

Semester 1

FYE 101
First-Year Experience
This course is designed to help first-year students make successful transitions to college student life. Students will examine what others have to say about the purpose and culture of contemporary higher education and will explore the opportunities for intellectual, academic, social and spiritual growth they face as a Concordia freshman. Through reading, discussion and writing, students will reflect on the ways their own values, beliefs, goals and learning styles may affect their experiences as students and their professional and vocational paths.
1
credits
BIO 111
General Biology I
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. A study of general biology: Science as a way of knowing — Scientific methodology and practice; literacy in biological literature and research, study of cells and molecular biology, cell organelles, inclusions, function, and a study of genetics.
4
credits
MATH 122
Introduction to Statistics
The fundamentals of elementary statistics, data collection and analysis, probability, distributions, sampling, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression.
3
credits
HHP 100
Lifetime Wellness
A course designed to provide an understanding of the values of wellness in our contemporary society and to aid the student in developing a personalized wellness program for optimal health.
1
credits
FINL 100
Financial Literacy I
Personal financial stewardship as it relates to students, specifically regarding the topics of budgeting, credit cards, student loans, and debt management. To be completed during a student’s first year at Concordia. Note: Passing this course with 0 credits meets one of Concordia’s graduation requirements. Taking the course for 0.5 credits may be beneficial in accumulating 120 credits, or in establishing full-time status. Taking the course for 0 credits may help a student who is already at 18 credits avoid paying extra for this course.
0.5
credits
REL 121
History and Literature of the Old Testament
A historical and theological survey of the Old Testament era and the Old Testament writings with an emphasis on summarizing and communicating their major themes.
3
credits
ENG 102
Experiences in Writing
This course focuses on helping students develop effective processes for writing in multiple genres, including research-based academic projects and creative works. Students will learn techniques for generating ideas; giving and receiving feedback; finding, evaluating and integrating sources; adapting rhetorical strategies for audience and context; revising; and editing.
3
credits
Total Credits
15.5

Semester 2

BIO 112
General Biology II
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. A study of general biology, a continuation of General Biology I: organismic biology, structure and function of plants and animals, reproduction, growth and development, population biology, evolution as a paradigm and ecology.
4
credits
BIO 244
Nutrition
A study of nutrients, their chemical structures, digestion, absorption and utilization in the body. The roles of nutrients, recommended allowances, their interactions and the results of deficiencies. May be used as an elective in general education component.
3
credits
PSY 101
Introduction to Psychology
The course is a survey of psychology as a natural science and a social science. As a study of human behavior and the mind, the course examines current sub-areas of psychology with attention to neurology, the environment, situation and experience, and the self. Throughout the content, the course also considers how presuppositions in philosophy and theology intersect, integrate, and conflict with views on the human condition.
3
credits
REL 131
History and Literature of the New Testament
A historical and theological survey of the New Testament era and the New Testament writings with an emphasis on summarizing and communicating their major themes.
3
credits
CTA 103
Experiences in Human Communication
An introduction to the basic principles of intrapersonal, interpersonal, group and public communication. The course includes listening, group dynamics, fundamentals of public speaking and information literacy.
3
credits
Total Credits
16

Semester 3

BIO 253
Human Anatomy & Physiology I
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. This course is a study of the normal structure and function of the human body. Topics covered include basic cellular biology and chemistry, tissue organization, the integumentary system, skeletal system, joints, muscular system and nervous system.
4
credits
CHEM 115
General Chemistry
Lecture 3, Lab. 3. General principles of chemistry: atoms and molecules, chemical reactions and reaction stoichiometry, phases of matter, electronic structure, bonding, molecular shapes, and intermolecular forces.
4
credits
BIO 251
Medical Terminology
Lecture 2. This course offers a systematic approach to understanding the language of medicine utilized by healthcare professionals. Medical terms will be introduced and defined through the context of anatomy, physiology, pathology, and clinical and diagnostic procedures/tests. The course will focus on accurate spelling and pronunciation of terms; building knowledge of basic medical vocabulary with an emphasis on prefixes, suffixes, roots, and combining vowels; and practically applying these terms in various healthcare settings.
2
credits
THEO 210
Faith and Life
This course examines the implications of Lutheran Christian theology for an understanding of vocation at both the personal and corporate levels. The emphasis of the course is on the application to life of biblically based Lutheran theology. Topics to be explored will include, but will not be limited to: a survey of the Reformation era, the proper distinction between Law and Gospel, two-kingdoms theology, the priesthood of all believers, vocation, stewardship, ethics, and select contemporary issues in Christian theology.
3
credits
HHP 182
First Aid and CPR
Safety, prevention of injuries, and first aid and CPR procedures as outlined by the American Red Cross.
1
credits
Total Credits
14

Semester 4

BIO 254
Human Anatomy & Physiology II
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. This course provides information about the normal structure and function of the human body. Major topics covered include the endocrine system, cardiovascular system, lymphatic and immune system, respiratory system, digestive system and metabolism, urinary system, fluid, electrolyte, and acid/base balance, reproductive system, and human development and inheritance.
4
credits
ART 101
Fundamentals of Art
An introduction to art. Emphasizing production of art through the exploration of design elements and principles; interpretation of art through cultural and historical context; investigation of nature and values of art. This course is for students with limited or no previous experience in art.
3
credits
ENG 201
Introduction to Literature
A general background in the reading, interpretation, evaluation and criticism of literature in various genres.
3
credits
SOC 101
Introduction to Sociology
Systematic analysis of culture, society, socialization, social control, social processes, and social institutions.
3
credits
CTA 333
Intercultural Communication
The study of cultural practices that influence the exchange of meaning between individuals and groups of differing cultural/racial backgrounds. The course is designed to provide students with a theoretical and practical understanding of the uniqueness of cultures, the resulting variations in communication styles and preferences, and to provide strategies and skills for successful communication across cultures.
3
credits
Total Credits
16

Semester 5

SCI 490
Science Ethics
This course will examine the moral codes and ethical decisions involved when working as a professional scientist. Real world case studies and hypothetical scenarios will be used to challenge the student’s thinking and decision making. Prerequisites: upperlevel standing, and major or minor in Science area.
3
credits
HIST 115
United States History
This course examines the history of the United States from the American Revolution to the present by focusing on the significant people, trends, and events that have shaped the nation. The course is also designed to develop students' analytical reading and writing skills, as well as hone their ability to think historically.
3
credits
BIO 351
General Microbiology
Lecture 2, Lab. 4. An introduction to the activities of bacteria and fungi. The laboratory will be concerned with the culture, physiology, and identification of the major groups of microbes. Emphasis is on pure culture technique and diversity of microbes in infection and disease.
4
credits
HHP 275
Introduction to Public Health
This course is designed to introduce the basic elements of public health including identifying and addressing population health challenges, determinants of health, and an overview of the health system. Additionally, this course will provide a history of public health, an overview of the core disciplines, and current events and issues in the field.
2
credits
PSY 221
Lifespan Development
This course will address the entire range of the human life chronologically from the moment of conception through death focusing on the physical, cognitive, social and personality development of each chronological period. Basic theories, research findings, and practical applications will be discussed.
3
credits
Total Credits
15

Semester 6

BIO 350
Gross Anatomy
2
credits
BIO 465
Human Diseases
Discussion of disease process and ill–health. Emphasis on epidemiology, prevention, treatment, and the understanding of the etiology of communicable and non– communicable diseases.
3
credits
BIO 322
Developmental Biology
Lecture 3. A study of normal and abnormal development in animals. Comparative studies of representative animals and man.
3
credits
HHP 489
Global Health
This course provides an introduction to important global health issues, including health determinants and key areas of disease burden currently affecting the developing world and the role that new health technologies can play in solving these problems.
3
credits
ECTA 160
Studies in Cinema
As the standard for mainstream film viewing becomes more focused on how much one can watch in a certain amount of time (binge-watching), this course will ask students to examine more closely qualities of individual films and overarching genres to better appreciate, understand and critique them. Students will use in-depth analysis to “read” films and to effectively articulate their significance, not only in terms of individual preferences, but also for enrichment and experience in media literacy.
3
credits
FINL 400
Financial Literacy II
Personal financial stewardship as it relates to students, specifically regarding the topics of budgeting, insurance and investments. To be completed during a student’s final year at Concordia. Note: Passing this course with 0 credits meets one of Concordia’s graduation requirements. Taking the course for 0.5 credits may be beneficial in accumulating 120 credits, or in establishing full-time status. Taking the course for 0 credits may help a student who is already at 18 credits avoid paying extra for this course.
0.5
credits
Total Credits
14.5
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Nursing Faculty

As experts in nursing, our faculty and instructors bring years of experience to the classroom.

Meet the faculty