No breakpoint

Schools and Instructors

Dual Credit Partner schools and instructors are full-fledged members of the Concordia University, Nebraska community. We hope to work together for the sake of educating and preparing students for lives of learning, service, and leadership! See below for ways to do so through dual credit courses, campus resources, scholarships, continuing education opportunities, and more!

School Benefits 

  1. COURSE STIPEND
    • Schools receive a $560 discretionary stipend per course with at least four students enrolled.
  2. CONTINUING EDUCATION SUPPORT
    • Graduate Tuition Waiver: Schools receive a Concordia University, Nebraska graduate course waiver for every 50 credits of student registrations. 
    • Subject Area Mastery Scholarships: Concordia provides scholarships up to $300/credit in any accredited program for teachers to earn the requisite graduate hours to offer dual credit in their content area. 
  3. RESOURCES
    • Partner schools receive free access to Concordia's online research library.
    • Teachers partner with Concordia faculty liaisons as co-educators for professional exchange and resources.

Requirements 

STUDENT ELIGIBILITY 

  • Juniors/seniors: 3.0 GPA automatic, or 2.50-2.99 GPA with parent permission 
  • Freshmen/sophomores: 3.0 GPA, parent permission, and course placement


FACULTY ELIGIBILITY 

  • Master's degree in the field; or
  • Any Master's degree plus 18 graduate hours in the field, which include subject-specific and content-area methods courses in Education degree programs; or
  • Tested experience, industry certifications, or demonstrated proficiency in foreign language and professional/technical fields.

Dual Credit Abbreviated Policies

Concordia Advantage Program

The Concordia Advantage Program provides a discounted dual credit tuition rate and more benefits for partner schools in exchange for communicating and distributing information on Concordia's other academic programs and opportunities. 

Concordia Advantage


Dual Credit Course Catalog 

English & Social Studies

ENG 102
Experiences in Writing
This course focuses on helping students develop effective processes for writing in multiple genres, including research-based academic projects and creative works. Students will learn techniques for generating ideas; giving and receiving feedback; finding, evaluating and integrating sources; adapting rhetorical strategies for audience and context; revising; and editing.
3
credits
ENG 201
Introduction to Literature
A general background in the reading, interpretation, evaluation and criticism of literature in various genres.
3
credits
CTA 103
Experiences in Human Communication
An introduction to the basic principles of intrapersonal, interpersonal, group and public communication. The course includes listening, group dynamics, fundamentals of public speaking and information literacy.
3
credits
ECON 101
Principles of Macroeconomics
A study of the performance of the American economy. Includes an introduction to national income, employment, fiscal policy, money and monetary policy. In addition, topics of economic stability and analysis of economic growth are covered.
3
credits
ECON 102
Principles of Microeconomics
Examination of the behavior of microeconomic units such as consumers, firms and industries. Includes analysis of the problems of monopoly, urbanization, income inequality and poverty. International economics and the world economy are discussed.
3
credits
HIST 115
United States History
This course examines the history of the United States from the American Revolution to the present by focusing on the significant people, trends, and events that have shaped the nation. The course is also designed to develop students' analytical reading and writing skills, as well as hone their ability to think historically.
3
credits
HIST 131
World Civilization I
Assesses the development of the basic political, philosophical, and cultural patterns of the ancient, near eastern, Asian, Greco–Roman, medieval and early modern European societies.
3
credits
HIST 132
World Civilization II
Special emphasis on major political, philosophical, cultural and economic trends in the modern world (since c. 1700) and the emergence of the world community. (May be taken independently of HIST 131).
3
credits
PS 111
American Government
An analysis of the U.S. political system and its operation, with emphasis on the national level; constitutional basis of the system, civil rights and liberties, major branches of government, political parties, interest groups, elections, policies and policy making.
3
credits
PSY 101
Introduction to Psychology
The course is a survey of psychology as a natural science and a social science. As a study of human behavior and the mind, the course examines current sub-areas of psychology with attention to neurology, the environment, situation and experience, and the self. Throughout the content, the course also considers how presuppositions in philosophy and theology intersect, integrate, and conflict with views on the human condition.
3
credits
REL 121
History and Literature of the Old Testament
A historical and theological survey of the Old Testament era and the Old Testament writings with an emphasis on summarizing and communicating their major themes.
3
credits
REL 131
History and Literature of the New Testament
A historical and theological survey of the New Testament era and the New Testament writings with an emphasis on summarizing and communicating their major themes.
3
credits
SOC 101
Introduction to Sociology
Systematic analysis of culture, society, socialization, social control, social processes, and social institutions.
3
credits
Total Credits
39

Foreign Language

ASL 101
Beginning American Sign Language I
This beginning course in American Sign Language (ASL) is designed for the person who has no experience in ASL. The course will focus on development of vocabulary and grammatical structures of ASL, receptive and expressive skill development, and the study of deaf culture.
3
credits
ASL 102
Beginning American Sign Language II
This course builds on ASL 101 by review and development of further vocabulary and grammatical skills in ASL. This course focuses on interpretive skills, receptive and expressive skill development, and the continuing study of deaf culture.
3
credits
ASL 201
Intermediate American Sign Language I
This intermediate course builds on ASL 102 by review, building of vocabulary and grammar knowledge in ASL, and continuing development of receptive and expressive skills in ASL. The main focus of the course is the development of active communication and interpretive skills and the use of ASL within a social context.
3
credits
ASL 202
Intermediate American Sign Language II
This final course in Concordia’s ASL skill development sequence continues to build vocabulary and grammar knowledge in ASL and development of ASL receptive and expressive skills. The main focus of this course is the polishing of communicative and interpretive skills and practical practice in the use of interpretive skills in various social and institutional contexts.
3
credits
CHNS 101
Beginning Mandarin I
The purpose of this beginner’s course is to train the student to function successfully in Chinese culture using Mandarin as a language through the development of communication skills that cross ethnic and cultural boundaries and an understanding of Chinese interpersonal behavior and related thought. This course focuses on basic speaking and listening skills, vocabulary, and grammar; it requires the student to demonstrate a level of cultural understanding suitable for correct performance of assigned tasks in Chinese.
3
credits
CHNS 102
Beginning Mandarin II
This course continues the Mandarin language and Chinese culture training initiated in CHNS 101 with more advanced topics in Mandarin conversational proficiency, vocabulary, and grammar. This course incorporates speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills; the student will learn to read and write a number of Chinese characters and the pinyin system. As in CHNS 101, the course requires the student to demonstrate a level of cultural understanding suitable for correct performance of assigned tasks in Chinese.
3
credits
CHNS 201
Intermediate Mandarin I
This course continues the student’s development of Mandarin language skills through more advanced training in conversational proficiency, vocabulary, grammar; the student will continue to improve speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills and will continue to learn more about Chinese culture. The course requires the student to demonstrate a level of cultural and linguistic understanding suitable for correct performance of assigned tasks in Chinese.
3
credits
CHNS 202
Intermediate Mandarin II
This final course in the Mandarin minor/subject concentration core sequence continues the student’s development of Mandarin language through more advanced training in conversational proficiency, vocabulary, and grammar; the student will continue to improve speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills and will continue to learn about Chinese culture. The course requires the student to demonstrate a level of cultural and linguistic understanding suitable for correct performance of assigned tasks in Chinese.
3
credits
SPAN 101
Beginning Spanish I
Aural–oral aspect of the language. Fundamentals of grammar with practice in reading and writing. Ordinarily not open to students having had more than one year of high school Spanish.
3
credits
SPAN 102
Beginning Spanish II
A continuation of Spanish I with increased emphasis upon speaking, reading, and writing skills.
3
credits
SPAN 201
Intermediate Spanish I
A systematic review of Spanish grammar. Development of writing and speaking skills. Study of selected aspects of Hispanic culture and society through reading and discussion.
3
credits
SPAN 202
Intermediate Spanish II
A continuation of topics and skills studied in Span 201. Reading and discussion of Spanish and Latin American literature and contemporary writings.
3
credits
Total Credits
36

STEAM

BIO 110
Principles of Biology
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. A study of general biology: Science as a way of knowing — Scientific methodology and practice, literacy in biological literature and research, study of cells, cell organelles, molecular biology, genetics, systematics, structure and function of plants and animals, reproduction, growth and development, population biology, evolution as a paradigm and ecology.
4
credits
BIO 111
General Biology I
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. A study of general biology: Science as a way of knowing — Scientific methodology and practice; literacy in biological literature and research, study of cells and molecular biology, cell organelles, inclusions, function, and a study of genetics.
4
credits
BIO 122
General Zoology
Lecture 2, Lab. 2. An introductory course in animal biology. This course includes the general biological concepts as they pertain to the animal kingdom.
3
credits
BIO 243
Elements of Human Anatomy and Physiology
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. A study of the human body, its structure and function. Course will include introduction to the microscopic and gross anatomy of the body, a survey of each body system and the homeostatic mechanisms of the body.
4
credits
CHEM 115
General Chemistry
Lecture 3, Lab. 3. General principles of chemistry: atoms and molecules, chemical reactions and reaction stoichiometry, phases of matter, electronic structure, bonding, molecular shapes, and intermolecular forces.
3
credits
CS 131
Computer Programming I
The development of skill in translating problems into algorithms and implementing these algorithms into a high- level programming language. An emphasis will be placed on good programming style including structured programming techniques. An overview of the organization and operation of a computer system will be given.
3
credits
GEOG 315
Environmental Science
This course provides a broad introduction to the field of environmental science. Topics include global warming, energy issues, food and agriculture, biofuels, pollution, wildlife management and conservation, human population, and natural systems.
3
credits
MATH 122
Introduction to Statistics
The fundamentals of elementary statistics, data collection and analysis, probability, distributions, sampling, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression.
3
credits
MATH 132
Intermediate Algebra
An overview of fundamental algebraic concepts. Real and complex numbers, algebraic expressions, equations and inequalities, functions, polynomials, rational expressions, graphing, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations and matrices.
3
credits
MATH 151
Pre-Calculus Mathematics
A study of elementary functions, their graphs and application, including polynomials, rational algebraic functions, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions.
3
credits
MATH 175
Finite Mathematics
Introduction to finite mathematics through the study of logic, sets, probability, statistics, game theory, vectors, matrices, and linear programming. Many applications.
3
credits
MATH 184
Calculus I
A beginning course in the analysis of functions including analytic geometry. A study of limits, techniques and applications of differentiation, basic integration and transcendental functions.
4
credits
MATH 186
Calculus II
A continuation of Calculus I. Topics studied include integration, analytical geometry and vectors in two-dimensional space, and techniques of integration.
4
credits
MATH 284
Calculus III
A continuation of Calculus II. A study of analytic geometry in three dimensional space, partial differentiation, multiple integration and infinite series.
4
credits
MATH 333
Linear Algebra
Linear algebraic structures, their theory and application. Matrices, determinants, linear transformations, programming, vectors and vector spaces, dependence, inner products, row operations and echelon systems.
3
credits
PHYS 110
Principles of Physics
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. A study of general physics through experiments, lectures and discussion. Science as a way of knowing — Scientific methodology and practice; mechanics of particles and of waves; momentum, energy and conservation laws; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; light; relativity and quantum mechanics.
4
credits
Total Credits
55

Technical & Professional

BUS 111
Entrepreneurship
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a solid foundation of the role by entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship in the 21st century global economy. To be examined: assessment, exploration, analysis and celebration of the phenomenon of entrepreneurship in for-profit and nonprofit settings.
3
credits
BUS 121
Financial Accounting
An introduction to the theory, language, and practice of accounting. Major components of the primary financial statements are examined. Emphasis on the uses of financial information.
3
credits
BUS 122
Managerial Accounting
An introductory course in managerial accounting. Topics include methods of costing, cost–price–volume relationships, flexible budgets, budget variances, capital budgeting decisions, and cost allocations.
3
credits
BUS 260
Marketing
Provides students with a thorough appreciation for the benefits and pitfalls of executing a customer orientation. Using market segmentation; management of mature products and introduction of new products. Developing long-term relationships with customers. Identifying and analyzing possibilities in consumer and industrial markets. Management of the marketing mix including product planning, distribution institutions and activities, promotion and pricing.
3
credits
HHP 100
Lifetime Wellness
A course designed to provide an understanding of the values of wellness in our contemporary society and to aid the student in developing a personalized wellness program for optimal health.
1
credits
HHP 182
First Aid and CPR
Safety, prevention of injuries, and first aid and CPR procedures as outlined by the American Red Cross.
1
credits
Total Credits
14