Bulldogs strength and conditioning

Concordia's athletics facilities are among the best in the nation for small colleges and its strength and conditioning programs take full advantage of them. Weightrooms are located inside Walz Human Performance Complex, completed in 2009, and the P.E. Building, remodeled in 2012. Bulldogs strength and conditioning programs also make use of the fieldhouse, stadium track/field and the numerous practice fields at Concordia.

Strength and conditioning efforts at Concordia glorify God and take inspiration from Romans 12:1, which reads: "Therefore, I urge you, brothers, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God--this is your spiritual act of worship."

The primary objectives of strength and conditioning at Concordia are to improve athletic performance and prevent injury.

Common training components 

1.  SPORT SKILL

2.  POWER

a.  Explosive exercises

b.  Jump training

3.  STRENGTH

a. Focus is on multi-joint exercises with single-joint used to further stability

b. Primarily body weight & free weight exercises

c. Static & dynamic core exercises for flexion, extension, and rotation

4.  SPEED

a. Linear and lateral movement

b. Resisted training with hills, stairs, and sleds

5.  AGILITY

a. Acceleration & deceleration 

b. Reaction time 

6.  CONDITIONING

a. Manipulate work to rest ratios to achieve desired adaptations    

b. Various activities to elevate heart rate are used 

7.  MOBILITY & STABILITY

a. Ability to move through a functional range of motion

b. Balance and control to move safely and efficiently   

8.  NUTRITION

a. Daily nutrition affects energy, recovery, and immune system health

b. Focus is on proper nutrition before supplementation

c. Hydration throughout the day and before, during, and after training

9.  REST & RECOVERY

10.  INTANGIBLES

a. Work ethic

b. Mental toughness

c. Competitive drive 

Amy Harms, director of strength and conditioning

Amy Harms has served as Concordia’s director of strength and conditioning since 2006.  In this role, she oversees strength and conditioning for men’s and women’s soccer, volleyball, women’s basketball, softball, and tennis. In addition, she was an integral part in the design and planning, purchase of equipment, and layout of the weight room in the Walz Human Performance Complex which opened in July 2009.

Harms earned a bachelor’s degree in secondary education in 2004 and a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction from Concordia in 2005. During her time as a student, she competed in women’s basketball and tennis. She then served two years as a graduate assistant coach for women’s basketball and one year for tennis.

Harms earned her credential as a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) through the NSCA in May 2005. In addition to her work in strength and conditioning, she is the assistant women’s basketball coach and a health and human performance instructor at Concordia.

Amy and her husband, Nolan, reside in Seward.

Contact

harms-small-60px_IMG_6645.jpgAmy Harms, MS, CSCS

Office:  #022B Walz

Office Phone:  (402) 643-7381

Email:  Amy.Harms@cune.edu