Chemistry

 
B.A.B.S. MajorMinorTeaching Endorsement

A degree in chemistry expands your understanding of chemical science. Your classroom and chemistry lab experience will open the door to careers where you can use your scientific passion to serve in healthcare, industry, research and more.

By studying organic chemistry, calculus and biochemistry, you will be prepared to enter graduate schools in pharmacy, biomedical science, medicine or professional chemistry. The chemistry degree also prepares you to work in government research, academia and healthcare. Opportunities to gain research and internship experience will help you use your knowledge in professional applications as you pursue a career in the chemistry field.

Graduate cap

90%
of alums are in professional or graduate school or employed in the health or science industry within 5 months of graduation

Chemistry Sample Academic Outcomes

 

Careers

  • Laboratory Technician
  • Analytical Chemist

Graduate Schools

  • University of Pittsburgh
  • Colorado State University
  • University of California Berkeley
  • University of Nebraska Medical Center
  • University of Texas - Austin

Chemistry Faculty

Chemistry Student and Alumni Reviews

Concordia University is focused on providing an exceptional experience and we ask our students to provide feedback on all aspects of their student experience. The ratings and comments below are from our annual survey of all graduating seniors regarding their experience in the Chemistry program, the academic department and the university.

 
 

A Space for Science

Human Anatomy

Concordia has a dedicated gross anatomy lab to help you train for a vocation in the health sciences and forensic science by performing autopsies, analyzing findings, and communicating diagnostic conclusions.

Scene of the Crime

At 545 Grand Avenue, there is a crime scene house to aid your study of forensic science experiments, demonstrations, and training. It’s a chance to get real-world, hands-on training of what it means to investigate a crime.

On the Prairie

Concordia has a dedicated area of prairie for training and research in ecology and other biological sciences, giving you the opportunity to study native plants, animals, and insects in their natural environment.

Eyes on the Sky

The Osten Observatory at Concordia University houses a computer-controlled telescope with different eyepieces and filters that allow you to view and study the stars and planets.

Under the Microscope

A phase-contrast microscope and molecular modeling software let you work on a cellular level, performing quantum calculations and molecular modeling of proteins, DNA, nanomolecules, polymers, and liquids.

Medicine on a Mission
Medicine on a Mission

As a student at Concordia, you will have the opportunity to participate in medical mission trips and to places like Belize, Costa Rica, and Guatemala. You can work in medical clinics, host health fairs, and share your faith through ministry programs.

Present Your Findings
Present Your Findings

Each spring, Concordia hosts the Concordia University Research Symposium. The symposium gives you the opportunity to present your personal research or project in either oral or poster presentation format.

Learning to Soar
Learning to Soar

Fontenelle Forest’s Raptor Recovery Center is an organization that rehabilitates injured raptors. Students at Concordia can not only visit and tour the treatment center, but assist with educational programs, special events, or as part of the network that protects and restores raptors to their natural habitat.

Chemistry Sample Course Schedule

B.A. B.S.

Semester 1

  •  
    Math 184 Calculus I
    4
    A beginning course in the analysis of functions including analytic geometry. A study of limits, techniques and applications of differentiation, basic integration and transcendental functions.
  •  
    Chem 115 General Chemistry
    4
    Lecture 3, Lab. 3. General principles of chemistry: atoms and molecules, chemical reactions and reaction stoichiometry, phases of matter, electronic structure, bonding, molecular shapes, and intermolecular forces.
  •  
    Gen Ed 8 Credit Hours
    8

Semester 2

  •  
    Math 186 Calculus II
    4
    A continuation of Calculus I. Topics studied include integration, analytical geometry and vectors in twodimensional space, and techniques of integration.
  •  
    Chem 116 General Inorganic and Qualitative Analysis
    4
    Lecture 3, Lab. 3. A continuation of general chemistry: chemical kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases, oxidation-reduction chemistry, and fundamental qualitative analysis.
  •  
    Gen Ed 8 Credit Hours
    8

Semester 3

  •  
    Chem 231 Organic Chemistry I
    4
    Lecture 3, Lab. 3. The compounds of the aliphatic and aromatic series, stressing general principles. The basic understandings in this area, an appreciation of the relation of organic chemistry to daily life.
  •  
    Phys 111 General Physics I
    4
    Lecture 3, Lab. 2. Experiments, lectures and discussions to reveal the sensibleness of nature via mechanics of particles and waves as models, relativity and conservation laws, momentum and energy, and the nature of scientific inquiry.
  •  
    Gen Ed 8 Credit Hours
    8

Semester 4

  •  
    Chem 313 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
    3
    Lecture 3. An advanced course with emphasis on inorganic chemistry from the standpoint of the periodic table. Atomic structure, theories of acids and bases, coordination chemistry, chemical bonds, and oxidation potentials.
  •  
    Chem 325 Quantitative Analytical Chemistry
    4
    Lecture 3, Lab. 3. The fundamental principles of gravimetric and volumetric quantitative analysis and including some instrumental analysis.
  •  
    Chem 331 Organic Chemistry II
    4
    Lecture 3, Lab. 3. This course, along with Chemistry 231, covers the material typically covered in the first year organic chemistry course
  •  
    Gen Ed 7 Credit Hours
    7

Semester 5

  •  
    Chem 345 Introductory Biochemistry
    4
    Lecture 3, Lab. 3. Introduction to the biochemistry of carbohydrates, fats, proteins and nucleic acids; the metabolism of foods.
  •  
    Chem 354 Physical Chemistry II
    3
    Lecture 3. A continuation of Chem 353, Statistical Mechanics. An introduction to Quantum Mechanics with applications to the structure of atoms and molecules and to spectroscopy.
  •  
    Phys 112 General Physics II
    4
    Lecture 3, Lab. 2. Continuation of Phys 111 with special emphasis on electricity and magnetism, light, and relativity and their relation to conservation principles and current scientific explanation.
  •  
    Gen Ed 5 Credit Hours
    5

Semester 6

  •  
    Chem 356 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II
    1
    Lab. 3. Same as Phys 356.
  •  
    Phys 211 General Physics I Calculus Topics
    1
    Lecture 1. A calculus-based treatment of topics covered in Phys 111. Enrollment in Phys 211 and Phys 111 is equivalent to taking a calculus-based general physics course.
  •  
    Gen Ed 12 Credit Hours
    12

Semester 7

  •  
    Chem 353 Physical Chemistry
    3
    Lecture 3. A theoretical study of chemistry dealing with the gaseous, liquid, solid and colloidal states of subdivision, solution, thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, equilibrium, and electrochemistry.
  •  
    Phys 212 General Physics II Calculus Topics
    1
    Lecture 1. A calculus-based treatment of topics covered in Phys 112. Enrollment in Phys 212 and Phys 112 is equivalent to taking a calculus-based general physics course.
  •  
    Gen Ed 12 Credit Hours
    12

Semester 8

  •  
    Gen Ed 16 Credit Hours
    16