Undergraduate course descriptions

Course descriptions

Course descriptions from the Concordia Catalog for 2013-2014 are listed below.


AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE

ASL 101 Beginning American Sign Language I (3)
This beginning course in American Sign Language (ASL) is designed for the person who has no experience in ASL. The course will focus on development of vocabulary and grammatical structures of ASL, receptive and expressive skill development, and the study of deaf culture.

ASL 102 Beginning American Sign Language II (3)
This course builds on ASL 101 by review and development of further vocabulary and grammatical skills in ASL. This course focuses on interpretive skills, receptive and expressive skill development, and the continuing study of deaf culture. Prerequisite: ASL 101 or program director consent.

ASL 150 Special Topics in American Sign Language (3)
This course offers students an opportunity to take classes in special topics areas related to American Sign Language with direct guidance from a qualified instructor.  It provides intermediate and advanced students with a context in which to expand their expressive, receptive, and interpretive skills, and/or the opportunity to study American Sign Language structure, storytelling, and culture.  Topic chosen and coursework decided upon in discussion with the instructor and program director.  Prerequisite: ASL 102.

ASL 201 Intermediate American Sign Language I (3)
This intermediate course builds on ASL 102 by review, building of vocabulary and grammar knowledge in ASL, and continuing development of receptive and expressive skills in ASL.  The main focus of the course is the development of active communication and interpretive skills and the use of ASL within a social context.  Prerequisite:  ASL 102 or program director consent.

 
ASL 202 Intermediate American Sign Language II (3)
This final course in Concordia’s ASL skill development sequence continues to build vocabulary and grammar knowledge in ASL and development of ASL receptive and expressive skills.  The main focus of this course is the polishing of communicative and interpretive skills and practical practice in the use of interpretive skills in various social and institutional contexts. Prerequisite:  ASL 201.

ASL 250 Special Topics in American Sign Language (3)
This course offers students an opportunity to take classes in special topics areas related to American Sign Language with direct guidance from a qualified instructor.  It provides intermediate and advanced students with a context in which to expand their expressive, receptive, and interpretive skills, and/or the opportunity to study American Sign Language structure, storytelling, and culture.  Topic chosen and coursework decided upon in discussion with the instructor and program director.  Prerequisites:  ASL 102, 150.

ASL 350 Special Topics in American Sign Language (3)
This course offers students an opportunity to take classes in special topics areas related to American Sign Language with direct guidance from a qualified instructor.  It provides intermediate and advanced students with a context in which to expand their expressive, receptive, and interpretive skills, and/or the opportunity to study American Sign Language structure, storytelling, and culture.  Topic chosen and coursework decided upon in discussion with the instructor and program director.  Prerequisites: ASL 102, 250.

ASL 450 Special Topics in American Sign Language (3)
This course offers students an opportunity to take classes in special topics areas related to American Sign Language with direct guidance from a qualified instructor.  It provides intermediate and advanced students with a context in which to expand their expressive, receptive, and interpretive skills, and/or the opportunity to study American Sign Language structure, storytelling, and culture.  Topic chosen and coursework decided upon in discussion with the instructor.  Prerequisites: ASL 102, 350.

ASL 490 Practicum in American Sign Language (3)
This practicum in ASL integrates knowledge of ASL and elements of what was learned through coursework into a supervised field experience which gives the student the opportunity both to observe ASL professionals and to communicate and perform duties within an ASL context.  Duration and structure of the field experience will be jointly determined by the program director, the ASL context supervisor, and the student.  Prerequisite:  ASL 201.

ART

Art 101 Fundamentals of Art (3)
An introduction to art. Emphasizing production of art through the exploration of design elements and principles; interpretation of art through cultural and historical context; investigation of nature and values of art. This course is for students with limited or no previous experience in art. Course fee.

Art 103 Drawing I (3)
Foundation in the basic perceptual, expressive and design aspects of drawing; use of various black and white media and diverse subjects.

Art 145 Digital Imaging (3)
Learning to apply the tools of Photoshop software to draw and manipulate computer designs and photographs. Course fee.

Art 161 Visual Studies (1)
Visual Studies will place an emphasis on the development of higher-level critical thinking skills and a broad introduction to the aesthetic vocabulary of form, concept, criticism and historical theories in the visual arts. Students will develop skills to articulate and defend critical positions about artists, works of art and art exhibitions.

Art 190 Introduction to Graphic Design (3)
Creative development of ideas, effective communication and correct technical reproduction of the graphic design process. Course fee. Prerequisites: Art 103, 145, 203.

Art 195 The History of Graphic Design (2)
A study of the diverse movements within the fields of painting, sculpture, printing, and photography which comprise the development of the graphic arts from the prehistoric period to the present time.

Art 203 Two-Dimensional Design (3)
Explores the elements and principles of composition, systems of organization, and the exploration of two–dimensional media. This course provides an analysis of the interaction between visual subject matter, form and content.

Art 205 Three-Dimensional Design (3)
An in-depth exploration of part-to-part to whole relationships in three-dimensional space. The origins of form and their meanings are also explored. Course fee. Prerequisite: Art 203.

Art 213 Drawing II (3)
Drawing II will place an emphasis on landscape and still life subject matter. Both traditional and experimental approaches will be considered. Prerequisite: Art 103.

Art 214 Drawing III (3)
Basic approaches to drawing the human figure (emphasis on drawing heads and faces); study of form, anatomy and expression and experimentation with various styles and techniques. Prerequisite: Art 213.

Art 215 Drawing IV (3)
The drawing of human figures is extended to composing the human form in groups and relating them to various spatial environments. Prerequisite: Art 213, 214.

Art 216 Advanced Drawing (3)
Concentration on personal goals and directions developed in consultation with the instructor will be emphasized. 

Art-223 Watercolor (3)
Exploration of the unique properties and potential of the watercolor medium; various styles and techniques. Prerequisite: Art 103.

Art 224 Advanced Watercolor (3)
Advanced credit in Watercolor, doing individualized work in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite: Art 223. May be taken repeatedly for advanced credit.

Art 235 Basic Digital Photography (3)

Explores photography as an art medium. No previous experience in photography is necessary, but drawing and design should be considered very important prerequisites. This is not a course in technical, applied, commercial, or professional photography, and we are not concerned with conventional problems, routine, or formula solutions. Specific, unique seeing is our goal and success is incumbent upon the ability to explore, with an open mind, a number of visual possibilities. The main emphasis and activity will be the production of acceptable pictures through the control of light, camera function, digital production, printing, and group critiques. Course fee.

Art 243 Ceramics (3)
Exploration of a variety of construction methods, including the wheel, and diverse approaches to glazing and firing. Course fee. Prerequisites: Art 101, 103.

Art 244 Advanced Ceramics (3)
Advanced credit in Ceramics, doing individualized work in consultation with the instructor. Course fee. Prerequisite: Art 243. May be taken repeatedly for advanced credit.

Art 260 The Christian Faith in Art & Architecture (3)
An exploration of ecclesiastical monuments in art and architecture with special concerns for symbolism, subject matter and contemporary worship environments.

Art 271 Art History I (3)
A historical survey of the art and architecture of European and near Eastern cultures prior to the Renaissance; art of Islam, Oceana and the native arts of the Americas.

Art 272 Art History II (3)
A study of painting, sculpture and architecture from early Renaissance through 19th century styles. The art of the Eastern cultures of China and Japan will also be explored. Prerequisite: Art 271.

Art 273 Art History III (3)
A study of the diverse movements within the fields of painting, sculpture, architecture and photography from the beginning of the 20th century to the present time. Recent developments in art theory will be emphasized. Prerequisite: Art 272.

Art 280 Typography (3)
Learning and applying the principles of good typography on the microcomputer. Course fee. Prerequisite: Art 190.

Art 301 Methods of Art Education (2)
Prepares to teach art history, art criticism, art production, and aesthetics in the elementary classroom. Provides opportunity to identify, understand, and evaluate children’s art work. Explores two and three dimensional media and the production of an art curriculum.

Art 303 Layout and Design (3)
Concentrated study in two-dimensional organization using the Macintosh computer and appropriate software as basic tools. Course fee. Prerequisites: Art 103, 190, 203.

Art 315 Printmaking (3)
Students learn to use selected printmaking techniques such as woodcut, etching, drypoint, aquatint, screen printing. Course fee. Prerequisites: Art 103, 203.

Art 316 Advanced Printmaking (3)
Students repeating Printmaking for credit will select the process(es) they wish to pursue further. Course fee. Prerequisite: Art 315. May be taken repeatedly for advanced credit.

Art 320 Digital Drawing (3)
Creating vector graphics on the microcomputer. Course fee. Prerequisite: Art 145.

Art 325 Painting (3)
Exploration of basic technical and expressive possibilities in painting that deal with a variety of problems in basic structure, elements of space, and surface quality. Prerequisites: Art 103, 203.

Art 326 Advanced Painting (3)
Continues Painting. Exploration of experimental painting techniques. Prerequisite: Art 325. May be taken repeatedly for advanced credit.

Art 330 Digital Painting (3)
Learning to apply the tools of pixel-based graphic programs to create artwork on the computer. Course fee. Prerequisite: Art 145.

Art 335 Advanced Digital Photography (3)
Art 335 builds on the skills learned in Art 225 and introduces students to more in-depth digital production, manipulation, process, photographic history, and aesthetics. This is an Advanced Studio Class. Students pursue individual projects in photography as a fine art medium. Tools (cameras, printers) and techniques are to be determined by students as appropriate to image and idea. The course includes lectures, research of historical and contemporary photographic issues, photography theory and criticism, demonstrations, discussions of technical processes and color theory, and critiques of student photographs. Students are responsible for their own digital camera. Course fee. Prerequisite: Art 235. May be taken repeatedly for advanced credit.

Art 345 Sculpture (3)
The various techniques of working with several basic sculpture media such as clay, stone, wood, plaster and metal. Emphasis on three-dimensional design as well as becoming sensitive to quality of materials. Course fee. Prerequisites: Art 103, 205.

Art 346 Advanced Sculpture (3)
Continues Sculpture. An opportunity for an individualized, in-depth exploration of selected aspects of a medium. Course fee. Prerequisite: Art 345. May be taken repeatedly for advanced credit.

Art 351 Illustration I: Focus on Retail Illustration (3)
Exploration in both B/W and limited color illustrations for retail advertising purposes. Illustrations are developed for product advertising, service advertising, promotional advertising for corporations and institutions. Techniques studied include: line art, continuous tone, and limited color continuous tone. Course fee. Prerequisites: Art 103, 203, 190.

Art 352 Illustration II: Focus on Editorial Illustration (3)
Editorial illustration studied in B/W and color techniques with an emphasis on arts, entertainment, travel and leisure activities. Editorial projects include imagery created for lifestyle magazines, books, posters, and other publications. Course fee. Prerequisite: Art 351.

Art 355 Scientific Illustration (3)
A concentrated study in developing skills and techniques with various media that are employed in scientific illustration. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Art 103, 351.

Art 356 Advanced Scientific Illustration (3)
Continued study in the media appropriate for technical illustration. Prerequisites: Art 103, 351, 352, 355. May be taken repeatedly for advanced credit.

Art 365 Introduction to Interactive Design (3)
Applying the principles of good design on webpages when placing images, text and tables. Course fee. Prerequisites: Art 190, 145 or permission from the instructor.

Art 370 Studies in Art (2)
A sequence of different topics offered each year for third– and fourth–year students in the disciplines of art criticisms, analysis, and aesthetics. Students in the BFA Studio and BFA Art Education programs must take this course three times for a total of six hours.

Art 375 Ecclesiastical Art Studio (3)
Work in conjunction with the Center for Liturgical Arts on projects ranging from stained glass window design to site-specific installation of art or worship accoutrements. Prerequisite: Art 325.

Art 377 Ecclesiastical Art Internship (3)
Internship in the field of Ecclesiastical Arts which would be with one of the following areas: Professional Artist, Church Internship, Architecture Internship.

Art 390 Graphic Design Internship (3)
Experience in Commercial Design; practice gained while working in an internship position within a professional graphic design firm. Prerequisites: 20 hours of studio art courses and permission from the art faculty. P/F. Students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and review the required process.

Art 399 Independent Study (2–6)
Hours and projects by arrangement.

Art 403 Advanced Layout and Design (3)
Students work on a self-directed sequence of advanced layout and design problems under the supervision of an instructor. Course fee. Prerequisite: Art 303.

Art 407 Advanced Graphic Design (3)
Concentrated study in conceptual and practical problem solving as related to visual communication. Course fee. Prerequisites: Art 303, 351, 352.

Art 425 Collage and Mixed Media (3)
A study of the history and theory of collage. Exploration of the unique characteristics and potential of collage; various techniques and styles for personal expression. Prerequisites: Art 103, 203, 205.

Art 426 Advanced Collage Mixed Media (3)
Continues Collage and Mixed Media. Concentrated study to develop competency in skills and expression. Prerequisite: Art 425. May be taken repeatedly for advanced credit.

Art 451 Illustration III: Focus on Global Consciousness and World Issues (3)
Editorial illustration studied in advanced B/W and color illustration techniques with an emphasis on global issues, social consciousness, charities, ministry, and mission-oriented image making. Editorial projects include imagery created for news magazines, books, posters, museums and museum exhibitions. Course fee. Prerequisites: Art 103, 203, 351.

Art 452 Advanced Illustration IV: Focus on Series Illustration (3)
Editorial or retail illustration studied in advanced B/W and color techniques with an emphasis on developing imagery in a series. Students in this course will pursue a single, semester-long project involving the development of numerous correlated images based on one selected theme. Course fee. Prerequisite: Art 451.

Art 489 Graphic Design Portfolio (2)
A guided plan of study resulting in a professional portfolio and resume. Course fee.

Art 490 Senior Design Studio (3)
An intensive project-based study in the combination of design & illustration as applied to long term/large-scale projects developed by students with peer & faculty review. Prerequisites: Art 280, 303, 351, 352, 403, 451.

Art 495 Graphic Design Practicum (3)
Two, three or four students operate a commercial art studio under the guidance of an art instructor. Clients are solicited from the campus and community. To be taken as an independent study course. Prerequisites: senior standing, portfolio presentation, and permission from the Art faculty. Students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/ practicum packet and review the required process.

Art 499 Honors (Senior Show) (1)
The student(s) prepares and displays a one, two, or three-person show. Prerequisites: art major, senior standing, and permission of the art faculty.

BIOLOGY

Bio 110 Principles of Biology (4)
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. A study of general biology: Science as a way of knowing — Scientific methodology and practice, literacy in biological literature and research, study of cells, cell organelles, molecular biology, genetics, systematics, structure and function of plants and animals, reproduction, growth and development, population biology, evolution as a paradigm and ecology. Prerequisites: 1 year of high school biology and chemistry.

Bio 111 General Biology I (4)
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. A study of general biology: Science as a way of knowing — Scientific methodology and practice; literacy in biological literature and research, study of cells and molecular biology, cell organelles, inclusions, function, and a study of genetics. Prerequisites: a year of high school biology; college chemistry or two semesters of high school chemistry with a grade of ‘B’ or better.

Bio 112 General Biology II (4)
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. A study of general biology, a continuation of General Biology I: organismic biology, structure and function of plants and animals, reproduction, growth and development, population biology, evolution as a paradigm and ecology. Prerequisites: a year of high school biology or Bio 111, college chemistry or two semesters of high school chemistry with a grade of ‘B’ or better.

Bio 141 General Botany (3)
Lecture 2, Lab. 2. Basic concepts of plant life through a study of the structure, functional form, reproduction and ecology of select plant groups from the plant kingdom.

Bio 207 Human Genetics: Applications and Issues (3)
A study of the basic principles of human genetics, their applications in society, and the issues that arise from these applications.

Bio 208 General Genetics (4)
Lecture 3, Lab. 3. An overview of genetic principles and their applications to inheritance including supportive studies of representative plants and animals. The lab will include both traditional and modern techniques in genetic analysis. Prerequisite: Bio 111 or instructor’s permission.

Bio 222 Entomology (3)
Lecture 2, Lab. 2. A survey of the orders of insects; dealing with structure, habitat and life cycles. Laboratory work, collection and identification of local insects. Taught as an independent study.

Bio 224 Invertebrate Zoology (3)
Lecture 2, Lab. 2. The structure, taxonomy, relationships and life histories of animals without backbones. Prerequisite: Bio 110 or Bio 112 or permission.

Bio 225 Vertebrate Zoology (3)
Lecture 2, Lab. 2. The structure, taxonomy, relationships and life histories of animals with backbones; includes functional vertebrate morphology. Prerequisite: Bio 110 or Bio 112 or permission.

Bio 230 Introduction to Forensic Science (3)
Lecture 3. Survey of the application of science to the law. Topics include pathology, anthropology, chemical analysis of drugs and other evidence, DNA, ballistics, and crime scene investigation. Prerequisites: high school or college level biology, chemistry, and physics, or concurrent registration with instructor’s approval. Same as Sci 230.

Bio 231 Introduction to Forensic Science Lab (1)
Lab. 2. Selected introductory laboratory applications in forensic science. Prerequisites: Bio 230 or concurrent registration. Same as Sci 231.

Bio 243 Elements of Human Anatomy and Physiology (4)
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. A study of the human body, its structure and function. Course will include introduction to the microscopic and gross anatomy of the body, a survey of each body system and the homeostatic mechanisms of the body. Prerequisite: College biology, Chem 109 or equivalent. Course may not be used in biology concentration, or major, or to fulfill requirements for health professional programs.

Bio 244 Nutrition (3)                                        

A study of nutrients, their chemical structures, digestion, absorption and utilization in the body. The roles of nutrients, recommended allowances, their interactions and the results of deficiencies. May be used as an elective in general education component.

Bio 271 Introductory Embryology (3)
Lecture 2, Lab. 2. A study of normal and abnormal development in animals. Comparative studies of representative animals and man. Prerequisite: Bio 111 or Bio 112 or instructor’s permission.

Bio 288 Animal Behavior (3)
A study of animal behavior, its theoretical basis, basic concepts, and applications to the interpretation of the natural world. The relationship of animal behavior to the study of man.

Bio 299 Introduction to Research in Biology (1–3)
Students will learn and perform biological research with upper level students (Students registered for Bio 399) under supervision of biology faculty. Bio 299 and Bio 399 students will meet as one class but will have different course requirements. Prerequisite: Bio 110, 111, or 112 and permission of instructor.

Bio 317 Ecology and Field Biology (3)
Lecture 2, Lab. 2. A field ecology course. Emphasis placed on fundamental ecological concepts with supportive material coming from the literature and field investigations. Prerequisite: Bio 112 or permission.

Bio 319 Cell and Molecular Biology (3)
An introduction to the structure and functions of cells, organelles, and cellular energetics. The study of cytogenetics and the control mechanisms of cellular function. The application of current research to biomedical practice as well as industrial processes. Prerequisites: Chem 345 and eight hours biology on the college level.

Bio 320 Histology (3)
A systematic study of tissues of vertebrates with primary emphasis on humans. An introduction to the technology used to prepare specimens for study. Introduction of histology to medical applications. Prerequisites: College chemistry (Organic Chemistry I recommended), eight hours of biology on the college level.

Bio 324 The Nebraska Story: Natural History and Writers of Nebraska’s Great Plains (3)
See Eng 324.

Bio 330 Advanced Forensic Science (3)
Lecture 2, Lab. 2. An advanced course focusing on the basic and applied science aspects of forensic science and criminalistics. Prerequisites: Bio 230 and Bio 231.

Bio 343 Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4)
Lecture 3, Lab. 3. A study of general principles of physiology, cell structure and function, cell metabolism and division. A survey of tissues, integumentary, skeletal, muscle, and nervous system. Prerequisite: Bio 110, 111, or 112, or approval of instructor. Lab required.

Bio 344 Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4)
Lecture 3, Lab. 3. A survey of the circulatory, respiratory, digestion, excretion, endocrine and reproductive systems. Introduction to nutrition and bio–rhythms. Prerequisite: Bio 110, 111, or 112, or approval of instructor. Bio 343 not necessary. Lab required.

Bio 345 Midwest Floral Identification (3)
Lecture 2, Lab. 2. The principles of flowering plant classification are studied. Plant family relationships and distributions are emphasized by collection and identification in field and laboratory. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.

Bio 351 General Microbiology (4)
Lecture 2, Lab. 4. An introduction to the activities of bacteria and fungi. The laboratory will be concerned with the culture, physiology, and identification of the major groups of microbes. Emphasis is on pure culture technique and diversity of microbes in infection and disease. Prerequisite: 12 hours of biological science; a year of high school chemistry or its equivalent. Course fee.

Bio 36_ Ecology and Natural History Study Tours (3)
A study tour focusing on the flora and fauna and ecological systems of a biologically unique area. Study tours have and will include trips to Belize, Yucatan Peninsula, Costa Rica, and various regions of the U.S., i.e., Alaska, Hawaii, Deserts of the Southwest, Pacific Northwest, etc. Study tours may take place during Spring Break or Summer School sessions. Permission from the instructor is required. Same as ESci 36_.

Bio 371 The Biology of the Brain (3)
A study of the structure and function of the brain, how the various parts of the brain interact, and implications of brain function. Neurodegenerative disorders are discussed as examples throughout the course. 

Bio 377 Conservation Biology (3)
An introduction to the principles and practices of conservation biology. Conservation biology is the discipline in science dealing with the preservation of biodiversity. The preservation of biodiversity requires input from biology, economics, sociology, political science, sociology, and philosophy. Same as ESci 377.

Bio 380 Biology Service Learning (2-3)
Special course developed and offered to explore biology-related interdisciplinary or advanced program service opportunities related to a particular community issue or need. Led by a faculty member with interest and experience in the special topic area. Specific course title and credits will vary per faculty member focus, course objectives, and depth of service–learning experience. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, declared major, and permission of instructor are required.

Bio 385 Physiology of Exercise
A course designed to give instruction in the physical processes of the body and how they relate to physical exercise. Applications will be made to areas of teaching and coaching and conditioning of the athletes. Prerequisite: upper-level standing; Bio 243, 343, 344 or instructor’s approval. Same as HHP 385.

Bio 399 Research in Biology (1–3)
Students will perform biological research under supervision of biology faculty and with assistance of students who are registered for Bio 299. Bio 299 and Bio 399 students will meet as one class but will have different course requirements. Writing Intensive course. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior level standing, and instructor permission.

Bio 417 Aging and the Brain (3)
See Gero 417.

Bio 450 Gross Anatomy (3)
Lecture 2, Lab. 3. A comprehensive study in the anatomy of the human being. Emphasis will be placed on the relatedness of structure and function of the musculoskeletal, nervous and organ systems of the body. This course is intended for students in the pre-health professions programs. Course fee. Prerequisites: Bio 343 or 344 and permission of the instructor.

Bio 465 Human Diseases (3)
See HHP 465.

Bio 489 Immunology (3)
This course details the components and function of the immune system. The generation of white blood cell types from the bone marrow is analyzed. The function of each type of white blood cell in providing resistance to infectious agents including bacteria and viruses is reviewed. Of particular emphasis is the role of chemical agents (cytokines) in initiating and coordinating the immune response. Topics of particular relevance include the genetic inheritance of immunity, the biology of immunodeficiencies, auto-immune diseases, allergies and hypersensitive reactions, vaccines, transplantation, antibody technology, gene therapy, and cancer. Prerequisites: Bio 343 and Chem 345.

Bio 498 Biology Internship (1-3)
Students gain experience in a biology and/or medical related field by working in an internship position under direct supervision of a biologist and/or medical personnel. Prerequisites: Bio 111, Bio 112, 12 hours of upper-level biology courses, Chem 115, Chem 231, or Chem 345, minimum junior standing and permission of the biology faculty. In addition to consulting with Biology faculty, students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and review the required process. (Note: This course may serve as an elective in the Bachelor of Science program in Biology. The term facility includes laboratories, research laboratories, clinical settings, field study sites, or other appropriate settings in which research takes place.)

Bio 499 Honors Course
Arranged for qualified seniors.

BUSINESS

Bus 111 Entrepreneurship (3)     

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a solid foundation of the role by entrepreneurs and entrepreneurship in the 21st century global economy. To be examined: assessment, exploration,   analysis and celebration of the phenomenon of entrepreneurship in for-profit and nonprofit settings. 

Bus 121 Financial Accounting (3) 
An introduction to the theory, language, and practice of accounting. Major components of the primary financial statements are examined. Emphasis on the uses of financial information.

Bus 122 Managerial Accounting (3) 
An introductory course in managerial accounting. Topics include methods of costing, cost–price–volume relationships, flexible budgets, budget variances, capital budgeting decisions, cost allocations. Prerequisite: Bus 121.

Bus 221 Intermediate Accounting I (4) 
An in-depth study of financial statements, accounting concepts and principles. Discussion of alternative theoretical views. Current professional pronouncements are examined and generally accepted positions defined. Prerequisite: Bus 121.

Bus 222 Intermediate Accounting II (4) 
Continuation of Bus 221.

Bus 261 Marketing (3) 
Provides students with a thorough appreciation for the benefits and pitfalls of executing a customer orientation. Using market segmentation; management of mature products and introduction of new products. Developing long-term relationships with customers. Identifying and analyzing possibilities in consumer and industrial markets. Management of the marketing mix including product planning, distribution institutions and activities, promotion and pricing. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.

Bus 281 Business Communication (3) 
The intense study of business writing and speaking using audience analysis. Implications for organizational communication and structure are considered. Major assignments include writing letters and reports for targeted audiences, analysis of organizational rhetoric as related to those products, self-presentation and audience analysis in interview situations, and editing skills. Prerequisite: Eng 102. Recommended: CTA 211. Same as CTA 281.

Bus 300 Business Law (3)
The course is designed to introduce the student to the rules of law under which the business world operates. It provides the student with a basic understanding of the legal rights and duties which arise from common business transactions. Topics include contracts, personal property, real property, insurance, estates and agency. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.

Bus 309 Small Group Theory for Teams and Leadership (3) 
Analysis and study of theories of small groups, including theories of leadership and the facilitation of groups and group dynamics. Areas of study may include goal setting, cohesion and norms, leadership, problem solving, conflict, and facilitating in groups. Prerequisite: Eng 102. Same as CTA 309.

Bus 321 Cost Accounting (3) 
Determination of product cost, effective cost control. Use of costs in setting budgets. Additional topics include process and job–order costing and inventory control. Prerequisite: Bus 122.

Bus 322 Advanced Accounting (3) 
Accounting theory and practice applied to business combinations, multinational accounting, governmental accounting, not-forprofit accounting, partnerships, trusts and estates. Prerequisites: Bus 221, junior standing.

Bus 323 Financial Statement Analysis (3) 
Application of concepts from introductory accounting and finance. Ratio analysis, capital budgeting, dividend policy, leverage, and acquisition valuation. Prerequisite: Bus 331 (also listed as Bus 333).

Bus 325 Accounting and Information Systems (4) 
Survey of the information systems discipline including accounting systems, information technology, telecommunications and networks, systems design and development and security/privacy issues. Improving organizational effectiveness through appropriate use of information system resources. Prerequisites: Bus 121, sophomore standing.

Bus 325A Accounting and Information Systems (1) 
A supplement to Bus 371, when students have taken Bus 371, focusing specifically on accounting information systems. Bus 371 (3 hrs) plus Bus 325A (1 hrs) is equivalent to Bus 325 (4 hrs).

Bus 331 Finance (3) 
Fundamentals of financial management. Policy, methods, institutions, and tools of financial management involved in financing the business organization. Prerequisites: Econ 101, Bus 121.

Bus 333 Corporate Finance (3) 
Application of concepts from introductory finance as well as a more thorough investigation of selected topics such as capital budgeting, dividend policy, leverage and acquisition valuation. Prerequisite: Bus 331 (also listed as Bus 323).

Bus 335 Investments (3) 
Investments is a course in management of financial assets. Major topics covered include an introduction to investments and the security markets, analysis and valuation of equity securities, issues in efficient markets, fixed income and leveraged securities, derivative products, and international markets. Prerequisite: Bus 331

Bus 336 Insurance (3) 
Designed to familiarize students with risk management, insurance, and career opportunities in the field of insurance. Recognizing and evaluating the property, liability, and personal risks facing businesses, non-profit organizations, government units, individuals, or families. Tools of risk management, selecting and dealing with an insurer, public policy issues. Prerequisite: Bus 331 or concurrent enrollment.

Bus 337 Banking (3) 
Designed to familiarize students with banking and career opportunities in the field of banking. The institutional and regulatory context of banking; management goals and performance evaluation; alternative policies for asset and liability management, liquidity and capital adequacy planning. Loan policies for commercial, international, and consumer credit; structuring of domestic and international commercial loans. Prerequisite: Bus 331 or concurrent enrollment.

Bus 343 Operations Management (3) 
A functional study of operational concepts as applied to managing the production of goods and services within a variety of environments such as profit, nonprofit, service and manufacturing-oriented organizations. Prerequisite: Math 122.

Bus 345 Management Science (3) 
Introduction to management science, including modeling, linear programming, integer programming, network analysis, waiting line theory, simulation, decision analysis, and inventory models. Prerequisite: Math 122.

Bus 351 Human Resources Management (3) 
Knowledge and skill-building for working with people in a business or organization. Business ethics as they relate to Christian principles. Theory combined with applications from psychology and interpersonal communications serve as the focal point of the course. Participants will learn to relate more effectively to others in the work environment. Prerequisite: junior standing.

Bus 362 Advertising and Integrated Marketing Communication (3) 
How marketers communicate — advertising, sales promotion, public relations, direct and personal selling, event planning, sponsorships. Setting objectives, message strategy, media strategy, measuring effectiveness. Management of promotional activities: advertising, sales promotion, public relations, direct marketing. Promotional objectives, budgets and strategies; organization of the advertising function; media selection and evaluation; advertising research and message, computer modeling. Prerequisite: Bus 261. Same as CTA 362.

Bus 363 Sales and Sales Management (3) 
Planning and implementation of personal selling activities. Sales force management concepts, including: objectives, organization, recruiting, selection, training, development, supervision, motivation, performance evaluation and control. Emphasis on industrial selling. Development of professional selling elements such as understanding buyer behavior, building trust, effective communication, leadership and teamwork skills, and the strategic selling process. Prerequisite: Bus 261.

Bus 364 Consumer Behavior (3) 
Studies the ‘why’ of marketing; why consumers prefer certain products and services. Emphasizes behavioral science concepts in an application–oriented environment as they relate to the process of consumption. Buying behavior and analysis. Perception, motivation, learning, attitude structure and change, social influences and cultural forces relevant to buyer behavior and decision processes. Prerequisite: Bus 261.

Bus 366 Marketing Research (3) 
Explores the role of marketing research in analyzing new opportunities in the marketplace through hands–on practice. Effective oral and written communication of research results is stressed. Topics include research study and instrument design, data collection and analysis, primary and secondary data collection, sampling and statistical analysis. Prerequisites: Bus 261 and Math 122.

Bus 368 Internet Business Models (3) 
Overview of the marketing and technical aspects of e-commerce. Introduces the Internet, the World Wide Web, and related technologies as they are used for the marketing, selling, and distribution of goods and services. Students develop an understanding of opportunities and limitations and how to use these technologies to improve marketing practice. Students are introduced to basic network concepts and protocols; how various markets (consumer, business-to-business, and government) make use of e–commerce. Prerequisite: Bus 261.

Bus 369 International Business (3) 
This course examines issues essential to an understanding of international business activity. It includes the nature of international business, international economic institutions and issues, international monetary issues, government activity affecting international trade, social and cultural effects on international business, human resource management and other related topics. Prerequisite: Bus 261.

Bus 371 Information Systems (3) 
Survey of the information systems discipline, including information technology, telecommunications and networks, systems design and development, and security/privacy issues. Improving organizational effectiveness through appropriate use of information system resources.

Bus 385 Arts Administration (3) 
See CTA 385.  

Bus 399 Internship (1-3) 
Students will take an internship as part of their program of studies in business. Students should consult with the director of business and the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and review the required process. P/F.

Bus 400 Business Ethics (3) 
A study of Christian ethics and practice in relationship to the conduct of business. Case studies are utilized to give skills in problem analysis and the application of the Christian vision. Prerequisite: junior standing.

Bus 401 Business Ethics (3) 
A study of Christian ethics and practice in relationship to the conduct of business. Case studies are utilized to give skills in problem analysis and the application of the Christian vision. Degree Completion Program only.

Bus 405 Professional Studies (3) 
A study of Christian ethics and practice within professional work environments. The course considers organizational and human behavior and integrates a Christian faith-based approach to ethics. Case studies are utilized to develop skills in ethical dilemma problem analysis and apply course concepts. Degree Completion Program only.

Bus 415 Retirement & Lifespan Financial Issues (3) 
See Gero 415.  

Bus 421 Tax Accounting (3) 
Examination of present federal tax laws with reference to accounting principles and procedures applied to the preparation of tax returns of individual and fiduciaries. Topics include gross income, capital gains and losses, non-business deductions, inventories and bad debts. Prerequisite: Bus 221 or permission of instructor.

Bus 422 Auditing (3) 
Methods of conducting various audits. Principles and procedures used to determine accuracy and reliability of financial records. Preparation of the audit report. The auditor’s certificate. Prerequisite: Bus 221.

Bus 442 Information System Design and Development (3) 
The activity of creating a new business information system. Systems investigation, analysis, design, implementation, maintenance and review. Prerequisite: Bus 325 or 371.

Bus 443 Organizational Behavior (3) 
A study of human behavior in organizational settings, the interface between human behavior and the organization, and the organization itself. Topics include organizational culture, diversity, gender communication, rewards and punishment, work place design, work teams, conflict management, leadership, total quality management and organizational development. Prerequisite: Junior standing or higher.

Bus 446 Administrative Policy (3) 
Designed to give the student practice in integrating the numerous theory courses in all phases of business management. In the role of the top manager, responsible for the total enterprise, the student applies these theories to the solution of problems in practical business cases. Decisions are made to direct the operation of a simulated business in a competitive market. Prerequisite: senior standing.

Bus 481 Organizational Communication (3) 
An overview and application of organizational communication theory. 

CHEMISTRY

Chem 109 Introductory Chemistry (3) 
Lecture 2, Lab. 2. An introduction to the concepts of inorganic chemistry, the common elements, and their compounds. Selected topics in organic chemistry, polymer science, biochemistry, food chemistry, and fuels chemistry. May serve as a prerequisite for Chem 115. This course is intended for students with little or no previous chemistry experience.

Chem 115 General Chemistry (4) 
Lecture 3, Lab. 3. General principles of chemistry with emphasis on inorganic. Prerequisite: A year of H.S. chemistry or Chem 109.

Chem 116 General Inorganic and Qualitative Analysis (4) 
Lecture 3, Lab. 3. A continuation of general inorganic chemistry and the application of the subject to the fundamentals of qualitative analysis. Prerequisite: Chem 115.

Chem 231 Organic Chemistry I (4) 
Lecture 3, Lab. 3. The compounds of the aliphatic and aromatic series, stressing general principles. The basic understandings in this area, an appreciation of the relation of organic chemistry to daily life. Prerequisite: Chem 115.

Chem 313 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3) 
Lecture 3. An advanced course with emphasis on inorganic chemistry from the standpoint of the periodic table. Atomic structure, theories of acids and bases, coordination chemistry, chemical bonds, and oxidation potentials. Prerequisites: Chem 116 and Chem 231.

Chem 325 Quantitative Analytical Chemistry (4) 
Lecture 3, Lab. 3. The fundamental principles of gravimetric and volumetric quantitative analysis and including some instrumental analysis. Prerequisite: Chem 116.

Chem 331 Organic Chemistry II (4) 
Lecture 3, Lab. 3. This course, along with Chemistry 231, covers the material typically covered in the first year organic chemistry course. Prerequisites: Chem 116 (or concurrent enrollment) and Chem 231.

Chem 345 Introductory Biochemistry (4) 
Lecture 3, Lab. 3. Introduction to the biochemistry of carbohydrates, fats, proteins and nucleic acids; the metabolism of foods. Prerequisites: Chem 231 and introductory biology.

Chem 353 Physical Chemistry (3) 
Lecture 3. A theoretical study of chemistry dealing with the gaseous, liquid, solid and colloidal states of subdivision, solution, thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, equilibrium, and electrochemistry. Prerequisites: Chem 116, Chem 231 and Math 186 (or concurrent enrollment in Math 186), Phys 111 is recommended. Same as Phys 353.

Chem 354 Physical Chemistry II (3) 
Lecture 3. A continuation of Chem 353, Statistical Mechanics. An introduction to Quantum Mechanics with applications to the structure of atoms and molecules and to spectroscopy. Prerequisites: Chem 116, Chem 231, Math 186. Phys 111 and Math 284 are recommended. Same as Phys 354.

Chem 355 Physical Chemistry Laboratory (1) 
Lab. 3. Same as Phys 355.

Chem 356 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II (1) 
Lab. 3. Same as Phys 356.

Chem 395 Advanced Topics in Chemistry Seminar (3) 
Advanced study of the concepts and techniques of an area of chemistry important to the field and outside the content of other chemistry courses. Specific topics will be determined by the instructor and the students, and may include Instrumental Analysis, Theoretical Chemistry, Chemical Synthesis, or Physical Biochemistry. Prerequisites: Upper-level standing in chemistry or approval of the instructor.

Chem 399 Chemistry/Biochemistry Internship (3) 
Students gain experience in a chemistry and/or biochemistry-related field by working in an internship position under the direct supervision of a chemist and/or a biochemist. Students should consult the Chemistry faculty and the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and review the required process. Prerequisites: Bio 111, Bio 112, Chem 115, Chem 116, Chem 231, Chem 325, Chem 331, minimum junior standing and permission of the chemistry faculty.


CHINESE

Chns 101 Beginning Mandarin I (3)

The purpose of this beginner’s course is to train the student to function successfully in Chinese culture using Mandarin as a language through the development of communication skills that cross ethnic and cultural boundaries and an understanding of Chinese interpersonal behavior and related thought.  This course focuses on basic speaking and listening skills, vocabulary, and grammar; it requires the student to demonstrate a level of cultural understanding suitable for correct performance of assigned tasks in Chinese. 

Chns 102 Beginning Mandarin II (3)

This course continues the Mandarin language and Chinese culture training initiated in Chns 101 with more advanced topics in Mandarin conversational proficiency, vocabulary, and grammar.  This course incorporates speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills; the student will learn to read and write a number of Chinese characters and the pinyin system. As in Chns 101, the course requires the student to demonstrate a level of cultural understanding suitable for correct performance of assigned tasks in Chinese. Prerequisite:  Chns 101.

Chns 201 Intermediate Mandarin I (3)

This course continues the student’s development of Mandarin language skills through more advanced training in conversational proficiency, vocabulary, grammar; the student will continue to improve speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills and will continue to learn more about Chinese culture.  The course requires the student to demonstrate a level of cultural and linguistic understanding suitable for correct performance of assigned tasks in Chinese. Prerequisite: Chns 102.

Chns 202 Intermediate Mandarin II (3)

This final course in the Mandarin minor/subject concentration core sequence continues the student’s development of Mandarin language through more advanced training in conversational proficiency, vocabulary, and grammar; the student will continue to improve speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills and will continue to learn about Chinese culture.  The course requires the student to demonstrate a level of cultural and linguistic understanding suitable for correct performance of assigned tasks in Chinese. Prerequisite: Chns 201.

Chns 301 Advanced Mandarin I (3)

This course bolsters students’ communicative competence in Mandarin listening, speaking, reading, and writing through more advanced instruction in vocabulary and grammar.  The student will develop the ability to distinguish between spoken discourse styles and written language genres and will utilize knowledge of Mandarin in spoken and written discourse with native speakers. Pre-requisite: Chns 202.

Chns 302 Advanced Mandarin II (3)

This course continues to build students’ communicative competence in Mandarin listening, speaking, reading, and writing through more advanced instruction in vocabulary, grammar, and linguistic norms.  The student will continue to gain Mandarin sociolinguistic proficiency and will utilize spoken and written Mandarin in authentic interactions with native speakers. Prerequisite: Chns 301.

Chns 321 Chinese Culture in Mandarin (3)

This lecture-style course, taught in Mandarin, discusses various topics related to the development of Chinese culture in the pre-modern and modern Chinese world.  Specific topics covered in the course will be selected at the discretion of the instructor based on the interests of the instructor and the students; these topics will include such areas as Chinese philosophical thought, Chinese government, the Chinese world outside of China (including communities in the US), economic development in the Chinese world, environmental awareness in China, and China’s changing demographics. Prerequisite: Chns 202.

Chns 341 Introduction to Reading in Chinese (3)

In this course the student will read, translate, and discuss a range of poetry, short stories, and literary excerpts in Chinese, both classic and contemporary.  Through this course the student will become acquainted with the long-standing Chinese literary tradition and its notions of what constitutes great literature, from a Chinese cultural point of view.  Reference will be made to contemporary adaptations of Chinese literature in modern films in the Western world and the accompanying shift in cultural viewpoint.  This course is taught in a mixture of Mandarin and English. Prerequisite: Chns 202.  

COMMUNICATION AND THEATRE ARTS

CTA 103 Experiences in Human Communication (3) 
An introduction to the basic principles of intrapersonal, interpersonal, group and public communication. The course includes listening, group dynamics, fundamentals of public speaking and information literacy.

CTA 151 Introduction to Dramatic Arts (3) 
An introduction to the appreciation of theatre as an international art form which reflects cultural values. Students increase their critical and analytical abilities by reading about theatrical production, and reading, viewing, and performing dramatic literature. They also participate in the production of theatre in an eight-hour lab.

CTA 152 Basic Acting Technique (3) 
An introductory acting course which enhances students' communication skills through the study of physical, vocal, analytical and intuitive techniques used in creating a character for theatrical performance.

CTA 153 Theatre History (3) 
A survey class that begins with ritual drama and selective Egyptian, Greek and Roman developments of dramatic form. It will include Medieval and Renaissance drama, Neoclassicalism, Romanticism, Realism and other twentieth century genres and styles as they occur in Western Europe and the United States. Contributions of selected Asian and African theatre forms and Native American dance drama will be also introduced.

CTA 154 Creative Drama (3) 
Dramatic exercises and improvisation for personal development and procedures for leading creative drama in classroom, parish, and other group settings.

CTA 200 Forensics (3) 
An overview of competitive speech events, argumentation, debate and practice. Students are required to prepare for competitive speaking and will study issues related to practice, coaching, research, budgeting and tournament administration and practice.

CTA 203 Communication Theory (3) 
Course features an overview of communication theory from the classical tradition to current theoretical approaches in human communication. In addition, the course will offer in-depth study in one of the following areas: instructional communication, organizational communication, mass communication theory, interpersonal communication and rhetorical theory. Special topics will be announced by the instructor prior to registration in accord with the instructor’s special interests and in consultation with prospective registrants. Location, analysis and application of research is a focus of the course. Prerequisite: Eng 102.

CTA 211 Public Speaking (3) 
Students develop fundamental skills in the art of public speaking through the preparation and presentation of speeches designed for a variety of occasions, audiences, and situations. Skills of organization, delivery, and speech criticism developed.

CTA 225 Writing and Reporting (3) 
Students will learn about the principles and techniques of news gathering and writing by reporting on stories of interest to the campus community. Students will also explore ethical guidelines and legal issues of contemporary journalism. Prerequisite: Eng 102.

CTA 226 Journalistic Design (3) 
Working in a laboratory setting, students will learn to apply rhetorical concepts and design principles in the production of communication pieces for various media. Special emphasis will be placed on newspaper design.

CTA 231 Oral Interpretation (3) 
Development of vocal and physical communication skills through the analysis and performance of literature. Students perform prose, poetry, drama, and non-fiction sources.

CTA 232 Costume and Makeup Design (2) 
This course teaches the principles and elements of costume design and provides instruction in basic stage makeup techniques such as aging, character makeup and stylized makeup. Prerequisite: CTA 153

CTA 233 Stage Scenery, Lighting and Sound (4) 
This class offers organized study of basic stage scenery design principles and set construction techniques. Students learn the basics of stage lighting design theory and the safe placement and circuiting of stage lighting. Students also study basic principles of sound amplification in a theatre setting and copyright laws concerning sound design. Students in these classes may assist with the current production(s) as class projects, but the course content is consistent from semester to semester.

CTA 241 Media: Impacts and Influences (3) 
Studies in print and electronic media as forces affecting the individual and society. Research projects and student media presentations enable the student to explore and experience techniques of mass media and assess their impact.

CTA 242 Introduction to Broadcast Journalism (3) 
Students will learn about principles and techniques of preparing news programming for radio and television. Students will explore ethical and legal issues unique to broadcast journalism.

CTA 281 Business Communication (3) 
See Bus 281.

CTA 285 Social Media (3)

This course will introduce students to the theory and forms of social media. What are social media, who uses them, who gains from them, and how are they transforming the media landscape, the way we understand our world and our ability to communicate effectively within it? Students will become familiar with a range of social media tools, analyze and discuss their uses and implications, and develop what media scholar Trebor Scholz calls “participation literacy.”

CTA 296 Journalism Practicum (1) 
Working on the staff of the student newspaper, students will utilize their reporting, writing, design and/or photographic skills. The course is required for the Journalism/Public Relations emphasis in the Communication major and for the Journalism and Public Relations minor. Prerequisite: CTA 225, CTA 226 or Art 235. P/F.

CTA 298 Forensics Practicum (1) 
Interscholastic speech competition including: literary interpretation, public address, parliamentary debate, Lincoln–Douglas Debate (NFA Policy Debate), and other events in competitive speaking. The course may be used for up to three hours in a communication major, although the course may also be taken for additional free elective hours. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

CTA 299 Theatre Practicum (1) 
Direct experience in play production in acting, assistant directing, theatre management or technical theatre design or construction. Students receive one credit per semester for 40 hours of participation in campus productions. The course may be used for up to three hours in a communication major or for General Education Fine Arts credit, although the course may also be taken for additional free elective hours. Registration does not guarantee an acting role, but all students who register will be given opportunities to earn credit in areas of technical theatre production.

CTA 300 Placement Seminar (1) 
The course includes resume and portfolio creation, attendance at professional placement seminars, mock interviews, meetings with field professionals and internship applications and searches. Prerequisite: upper–level standing or permission of department chair. Also offered as Eng 300 Placement Seminar.

CTA 301 Public Relations (3) 
An exploration of the diverse field of public relations, as it is practiced in large corporations, small businesses, educational institutions and church-related organizations. Students will examine the role, methods and ethical considerations of the profession.

CTA 302 Rhetorical Theory (3) 
An overview of the historical development of rhetoric and rhetorical theory beginning with the ancients and continuing into the contemporary period. Topics include: Greek, Roman, and other European traditions in rhetoric as well as contemporary issues in rhetoric including minority contributions to rhetoric, the development of current speech and composition theory, and future trends in rhetorical study. Prerequisite: Eng 102.

CTA 306 Interpersonal Communication in Film and Television (3) 
In-depth work and analysis of interpersonal communication using film and television as a mode of study. Topics include relationship development and maintenance strategies, nonverbal communication in relationships, conflict resolution and impression management strategies. Prerequisite: Eng 102.

CTA 309 Small Group Theory for Teams and Leadership (3) 
See Bus 309.

CTA 311 Persuasion, Argumentation and Debate (3) 
Analysis and application of the ways in which beliefs, values, attitudes, and behavior are deliberately influenced through communication. Areas of study include debate and argumentation, logic, persuasion, propaganda campaigns in both written and oral forms. Formalized debates and public speeches are among class activities. Prerequisite: CTA 211.

CTA 385 Arts Administration (3) 
An overview of the field of arts administration, including curation, development, public relations and education. Same as Bus 385.

CTA 327 Advanced Writing and Reporting (3) 
A deeper exploration of the topics introduced in CTA 225. Students will study several areas of news coverage and produce stories for the campus newspaper or other publications. Prerequisite: CTA 225.

CTA 333 Intercultural Communication (3) 
The study of cultural practices that influence the exchange of meaning between individuals and groups of differing cultural/racial backgrounds. The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the uniqueness of cultures, the resulting variations in communication styles and preferences, and to provide strategies and skills for successful communication across cultures. Students will have a 20-hour lab requirement (outside of class) attached to the course. Prerequisites: Eng 102 or Eng 231. Sophomore standing or higher.

CTA 362 Advertising and Integrated Marketing Communication (3) 
See Bus 362.

CTA 373 Play Production (3) 
Designed to prepare the student in the artistic techniques of play direction and supervision in the areas of set design and construction, lighting, makeup, costuming, and publicity. Lab sessions and the direction of a one-act play offer actual experience in directing actors. Prerequisite: CTA 152 and CTA 153.

CTA 399 Independent Study 
Topic, instructor and hours by arrangement. May be used to pursue special interests in any of the communication major emphases. Prerequisites vary according to program; junior or senior standing and permission of instructor are required.

CTA 400 Communication Research (3) 
An overview of the methodological approaches to communication research. Students are strongly encouraged to enroll in this course prior to taking independent research/thesis projects in CTA 399 or 499. Topics include: types of research questions, approaches, philosophy of knowledge, and structure of research. Required for all communication majors. Prerequisite: Eng 102 and one CTA theory class.

CTA 488 Conflict Resolution: Coaching (3) 
See Educ 488.

CTA 489 Conflict Resolution: Mediation II (3) 
See Educ 489.

CTA 499 Internship (1–3) 
Students and instructors work together to arrange suitable professional experiences with specified goals, activities and evaluation procedures. The course may be used to fulfill requirements in the Communication major or the Composition and Rhetoric minor. Prerequisites vary according to program; junior or senior standing. Permission of instructor is required. Students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and review the required process. P/F.

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CS 121 Programming and Applications (3) 
The first half of the semester is spent in development of skill in translating problems into algorithms as simple programs in a high-level programming language. The second half of the semester includes projects related to word processing, databases, electronic spreadsheets and graphics.

CS 131 Computer Programming I (3) 
The development of skill in translating problems into algorithms and implementing these algorithms into a high-level programming language. An emphasis will be placed on good programming style including structured programming techniques. An overview of the organization and operation of a computer system will be given.

CS 141 Computer Programming II (3) 
Continued development of discipline in program design, writing, testing and debugging with C++ as the high level programming language. Algorithms to be studied include internal sorting and searching methods, string processing, and the manipulation of data structures: arrays, stacks, queues, and linked lists. Prerequisite: CS 131.

CS 231 Introduction to Computer Systems (3) 
An introduction to the architecture of a computer system at the hardware register level. In addition to a general discussion of the organization of a central processing unit specific examples of both CISC and RISC architectures are discussed in detail. Prerequisite: CS 141.

CS 241 Introduction to Computer Organization (3) 
An introduction to logic design including properties of gates and flipflops, the design of simple logical networks, representation of information as digital signals, and implementation of arithmetic operations. The mechanics of information transfer and logical control within a computer system will be studied. Laboratory work circuits and breadboards is an essential component of this course. Prerequisite: CS 141.

CS 251 Introduction to File Processing (3) 
Storage, manipulation, and retrieval of information stored in large files on bulk storage devices such as disks and tapes. Organization of file systems including relational databases is a key topic. Algorithms for manipulating data structures appropriate to file processing are discussed Prerequisite: CS 141.

CS 261 Operating Systems and Computer Architecture I (3)
An introduction to the concepts of operating systems with an emphasis on the inter-relationship between the operating system and the hardware architecture of the computer system. Prerequisites: CS 231, 241 (251 is recommended).

CS 321 Numerical Analysis (3) 
See Math 321.

CS 324 Computer Graphics (3) 
An introduction to the generation and manipulation of graphical images on computer displays. Both 2D and 3D graphics are covered with an emphasis on hierarchical modeling. Topics include clipping, representation of curves and surfaces, 2D and 3D transformations, hidden edge and surface elimination, shading and others. Prerequisite: CS 141 or equivalent.

CS 334 Organization of Programming Languages (3) 
An applied course in programming language constructs emphasizing the run-time behavior of computer programs. The course provides an introduction to formal and theoretical aspects of programming languages and will include a comparison of many current languages. Prerequisite: CS 141 (CS 231 and CS 251 are highly recommended).

CS 341 Computer Networks (3) 
A multi-layered view of a computer network is investigated with particular attention given to Ethernet-based networks and the TCP/IP protocol stack. Topics include physical vs. logical design of a network, physical media, signal transmission methods, switching, routing, error handling, network applications and the protocols utilized at each layer. Students write peer-to-peer and client/server programs that communicate over a network. Each student independently investigates a networking topic of their choice, prepares a paper on their findings and presents the information to the class. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in CS 251 and CS 261.

CS 344 Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis (3) 
A course which will apply analysis and design techniques to non-numeric algorithms which act on data structures. Algorithm analysis and design criteria will be utilized in the selection of methods for data manipulation in such areas as database management, memory management, and system design. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in CS 141.

CS 348 Discrete Structures (3) 
An applied course in discrete mathematical structures emphasizing their application to computer science. The course will relate mathematical concepts such as sets, trees, graphs, logic, combinatorics, relations and groups to computer science problems and applications. Computer science topics integrated into the course include data structures, algorithm design and algorithmic analysis and testing. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in CS 131. Math 252 is strongly recommended.

CS 351 Database Design and Management (3) 
Principles for the design and management of database systems including data and storage models; relational, hierarchical, and network models and associated access operations, relational algebra and calculus; inquiry languages; normalization; logical and physical database design; distributed systems; and concurrency, integrity, and security issues. Emphasis on database planning and implementation through applications using a database system. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in CS 251.

CS 361 Operating Systems and Computer Architecture II (3) 
A course to continue the development of operating systems and computer architecture. Concurrent processes, name management, resource allocation, protection and access implementation, and advanced implementations of pipelining, parallelism, user interface considerations, networking, and distributed systems will be studied. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in CS 261.

CS 39x Seminar in Computer Science (3) 
Current topics in the constantly and rapidly changing field of computer science will be the focus of this course. Possible topics include Database Design, Artificial Intelligence, Networks, Microcomputer Applications, Software Design and Development, Automata and Formal Languages, and Compiler Design. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in CS 141.

CS 391 Computer Science Senior Project (3) 
The Senior Project in Computer Science is intended to provide students with an opportunity to extend and advance the computer science experience and knowledge received in other coursework and to provide students with a “real-world” experience. The student will work independently in consultation with a faculty mentor for one semester and will be responsible for the work and progress that he/she accomplishes in completing a functional and creative “real-world” application. Students will be expected to conduct research appropriate and applicable to their project. Prerequisite: must have completed at least 21 hours of CS courses; senior standing.

CS 399 Computer Science Internship (3) 
Students gain experience in a computer science-related field while working in an internship position under the direct supervision of a computer professional. Students should consult with the computer science faculty and the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and review the required process. This course may be used to satisfy the 128 hours necessary for graduation. Prerequisites: 18 hours of computer science, junior standing and permission of the computer science faculty.

CS 442 Management Information Systems Design and Development (3) 
See Bus 442.


CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CJ 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3)
This is an introductory class to the study of criminal justice. Students will be introduced to the history of the American Criminal Justice system and its primary components: law enforcement, courts, corrections, police work, types of crime and responses to crime.

CJ 200 Introduction to Law Enforcement (3)
Introductory course on the role of police in American society and the functions of law enforcement professionals. This course will cover topics within the field of criminal justice from a law enforcement perspective. Prerequisite: CJ 101.

CJ 300 Criminal Investigations (3)
This course introduces criminal investigation procedures. Investigative processes related to law enforcement will be reviewed, including the limits on such investigations. Prerequisite: CJ 101.

CJ/Soc 321 Criminology (3)
This course examines the theories, causes and different responses to crime. It examines crime in the U.S. and other countries from juvenile to adult crime and differences between males and females in addition to what is even considered crime.

CJ/Soc 325 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (3)
This class is designed to offer variable topics in the field of criminology or criminal justice. Topics will go in depth on a particular topic to expand knowledge and skill in this specific area. Further description will be given for individual topics. This class may be repeated with different topics.

CJ 350 Overview of the American Legal System (3)
This course will provide students with a basic knowledge of criminal and civil laws and judicial procedures in the United States of America. Discussion of federal, state, and local laws will be covered. Prerequisite: PS 111.

CJ 400 Ethics in Criminal Justice (3)
This course will examine the moral codes and ethical decisions involved when working within the criminal justice system. Prerequisite: CJ 101.

CJ 481 Criminal Justice Internship (3)
The Criminal Justice Internship is a planned and supervised educational experience which integrates the knowledge and theory of criminal justice gained through course work with field experience. Students observe professionals in the field and participate as determined between the supervisor of that agency and the student. Students must contact the office of career services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and complete the required process. Prerequisite: upper-level standing and instructor approval.

 

ECONOMICS

Econ 101 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) 
A study of the performance of the American economy. Includes an introduction to national income, employment, fiscal policy, money and monetary policy. In addition, topics of economic stability and analysis of economic growth are covered.

Econ 102 Principles of Microeconomics (3) 
Examination of the behavior of microeconomic units such as consumers, firms and industries. Includes analysis of the problems of monopoly, urbanization, income inequality and poverty. International economics and the world economy are discussed.

Econ 104 Principles of Macroeconomics (3) 
A study of the performance of the American economy. Includes an introduction to national income, employment, fiscal policy, money and monetary policy. In addition, topics of economic stability and analysis of economic growth are covered. Degree Completion Program only.

EDUCATION

Educ 101 Teaching as a Profession (1) 
Introduces a broad picture of K–12 teaching as a career in Lutheran schools, other private schools and public schools. Students will be introduced to the teacher education program and guided in the process of application to the program. Participation in at least 10 hours of focused K–12 classroom observations required.

Educ 201 Introduction to Education (3) 
An orientation to the field of education with an emphasis on the service role of the teacher. Historical, philosophical, and sociological foundations of American public and private education are explored. Current trends and issues are examined. Prerequisite: Educ 101. May not be taken first semester of freshman year. Should be taken the same semester as EDPS 210.

Educ 211 Middle Level Seminar I (2) 
An exploration of middle level curriculum, students, and organizational patterns, intended to introduce middle level concepts to individuals interested in pursuing a middle level endorsement. Action research will necessitate out-of-class time involving middle level students, faculty and parents. Sem I only. Prerequisites: Educ 201, or take simultaneously.

Educ 229 Introduction to DCE Ministries (2) 
A study of church work roles in the LCMS with a focus on Director of Christian Education (DCE) ministry including its history, issues, and current practice. Students will also by given opportunity to reflect on their fit and commitment to training for DCE ministry within Concordia’s model of preparation.

Educ 235 CEL Field Experiences I (1)
An examination of the operational and administrative structures of the local congregation. The student will complete a guided, on-site analysis of a congregation, focusing especially on topics related to administrative structures, budgeting, vision/mission/goals, decision-making processes, participation levels, staffing and risk management.

Educ 295 History of Public Education (3)
This course explores the history of public education in the United States to establish a foundation for current educational practices in public elementary, middle level, and secondary schools.

Educ 296 Topics in Public Education (3)
This course explores concepts and issues related to the ministry of teaching in a public school setting.  Topics include but are not limited to; philosophical foundations of public education, basic concepts of school law, public and private school separation and cooperation, teachers’ unions and collective bargaining, assessment of teachers and tenure, and the role of the state government.  This class is required for all students enrolled in the Public Education program.

Educ 300 Outdoor Christian Education (2) 
This course is an examination of the historical and contemporary purposes and formats of Outdoor Christian Education. Students will be equipped with the skills needed to implement an effective Outdoor Christian Education program in a congregational or school setting. Travel fee.

Educ 301 Principles of Secondary Education (2) 
The purpose of this course is to review and further develop instructional planning, models of teaching and classroom management in today's Lutheran and public secondary schools. Segments include skill development as teachers, leaders and learners affecting successful middle and secondary school teachers. Segments also include assessment strategies, multicultural education, mainstreaming, master teachers’ reflections, interview procedures, and the Christian teacher’s mission. Student Teaching I runs concurrently with this course. Class presentations and observations are required.

Educ 314 Assessment, Evaluation, and IEP (3) 
This course will provide pre–service teachers with the knowledge of how to select, administer, score and interpret a standardized/norm referenced assessment for exceptional learners. The development of an IEP and the Administration of both formal and informal assessment tools will be covered. Using data gained in order to improve student achievement will be discussed. Prerequisites: Psy 324.

Educ 315 Behavior Disorders and Intervention (3) 
This course offers an overview of the behavioral and emotional disorders commonly found in special and general education classrooms. Principles of effective inclusive instruction, applied behavioral analysis, behavior management, functional assessment and intervention are taught. Prerequisites: Psy 324.

Educ 316 Teaching Students with Moderate Disabilities (3) 
This course examines the various approaches to working with and the characteristics of students with moderate disabilities, including mental retardation and autism. Specific topics addressed include characteristics, assessment, curriculum and adaptations, appropriate school placement, transition, and support into adulthood. Prerequisites: Psy 324.

Educ 317 Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities (3) 
This course offers an overview of the curriculum and methods that have proven to be effective when teaching students with learning disabilities. Issues related to the academic and social characteristics of these students, as well as assessment procedures, related services and placement options will be discussed. Prerequisites: Psy 324.

Educ 329 DCE Ministries II; The Emerging DCE (2) 
This course will address such topics as wellness for the DCE, the Call, conflict resolution and identifying and responding to emerging issues impacting congregational ministry. This course will be offered in a hybrid delivery of one mandatory weekend retreat and on-line work. Activities fee.

Educ 330 Early Childhood Education Foundations and Programs (3) 
An introduction to early childhood education, this course provides knowledge of the history, philosophy, and trends in this field. A variety of current models and programs will be explored, with class visits to several programs. Sem. II only.

Educ 331 Infants and Toddlers: Development, Curriculum and Teaching (3) 
A study of appropriate infant and toddler programs (birth to age three), including an overview of development, quality routines, appropriate environments, materials and activities, and teaching/guidance techniques. This methods course will be required for all Early Childhood endorsement candidates. Sem. I only.

Educ 332 Early Childhood Education Curriculum and Methodology (3) 
Students will learn developmentally appropriate content and various methods for guiding the growth of children in Christian environments which meet the unique needs of children ages three thorough five. 30 hours of field experience is required. Sem. I only.

Educ 333 Primary Education and Literacy Development (3) 
Designed to prepare the teacher of children ages six through eight for teaching the basic skills, organizing the primary curriculum, and selecting appropriate techniques and materials. Emphasis will be given to the development of literacy in young children. 10 hours of field experience is required. Sem. II only.

Educ 335 CEL Field Experiences II (1) 
An examination of the educational ministries of the local congregation. The student will complete an a guided, on-site analysis of a congregation’s educational efforts, focusing especially on volunteer recruitment and management, record-keeping, scope and sequence, evaluative efforts, teaching methodologies, participation levels and hoped-for outcomes.

Educ 346 Instructional Technology (3) 
Technology has changed the way we work and live in such a profound way that the ability to use it effectively has been widely recognized as a new literacy. Students are expected to use technology to create, innovate, critically think, problem solve, communicate, and collaborate. Teachers must possess the knowledge and skills necessary to lead students in using current technologies in a responsible and beneficial way. Most importantly, they must have a fundamental understanding of its importance in teaching and learning, thereby creating a willingness to learn and integrate the technologies of the future. This course will offer a practical and hands-on exploration of using technology in the K-12 classroom.

Educ 349 Principles of Career Education and Supervision of Work Learning (3)
Overview of initial employment and careers in business, marketing and information technology. Managing a work-based learning program, including the supervision of students in the workplace.

Educ 358 Religious Education and Innovative Technology (2) 
Technological advances have introduced new methods of educating – and need to be better understood in regards to how they can enhance religious education in the church. This class is meant to enhance the ability of the individual to make effective use of technology for teaching and church promotional efforts.

Educ 361 Literacy Instruction, Assessment and Intervention (6) 
See Educ 461.

Educ 362 Teaching the Christian Faith (2) 
The course will enable participants to plan, develop, implement and evaluate religious instruction in Lutheran elementary schools and part-time agencies, such as mid-week school. Particular attention is given to the goals of church education, planning skills, methods, resource utilization, and curriculum concerns of teaching the Christian faith. Prerequisites: junior standing or special permission.

Educ 363 The Teacher Laboratory—Elementary Methods (6) 
The Teacher Laboratory emphasizes the preparation for the teaching of mathematics, science, social studies and music. The student is involved with others in the process of continual development of attitudes, knowledge and skills needed by classroom teachers as they plan, present and evaluate their lessons and class management. Development of attitudes conducive to projection of a professional image is also an important part of the laboratory experiences. The course consists of in-class sessions, field contact with local schools and some self–paced learning. It is designed to assist prospective teachers in making the transfer to the role of a full teaching professional. The course is part of the professional semester and requires a 40 hour per week commitment.

Educ 364 The Teacher Laboratory—Middle Level Methods (3) 
This course emphasizes the preparation for the teaching of mathematics, science, and social studies in the middle level classroom. The student is involved with others in the process of continual development of attitudes, knowledge and skills needed by classroom teachers as they plan, present and evaluate their lessons and class management. Sem I only.

Educ 365 Physical Education in Elementary and Middle Level Education (3)
A study of methods, materials, curriculum development and evaluation of physical education programs in elementary and middle level education.  Prerequisite: HHP100, 291, and upper-level standing.  15 hours of field experience required.  Same as HHP 365

Educ 366 Health Methods and Curriculum Design (3)
A study of methods, materials, curriculum development, and evaluation of health education programs in the school.  Prerequisite: HHP 181 and upper-level standing.  Same as HHP 366

Educ 367 Methods in Secondary Modern Languages* (2) 
Exploration of teaching methodologies and curricular materials. Course organization, selection of content, methods of evaluation, and close examination of a variety of teaching models involving conversation, reading, and writing of a modern language. II Sem. only.

Educ 368 Methods in Computer Science* (2) 
Methods, materials, and philosophy to equip the student to teach computer science at any level, to support the use of the computer in the whole school, and to manage the school computer lab. Learning and using LOGO is a major component of this course.

Educ 369 Methods in Secondary Business Education* (2) 
Instruction and practice in determining what to teach in the basic business courses in secondary schools and how to teach that content, including resources for effective teaching. II Sem. only.

Educ 370 Content Area Literacy (3) 
See Educ 470.

Educ 371 Methods in Secondary English* (2) 
Examines current research, theory, and practice in the teaching of secondary English/Language Arts. Presents topics related to philosophy, content, methodology, course organization, evaluation, and assessment. Special attention to problems of the profession and concerns of the future English teacher. Connects instructional theory and practice with student teaching I practicum.

Educ 372 Methods in Secondary Social Studies* (2) 
Purposes of the secondary social studies program. A rationale for social studies in the Lutheran high school. Recent developments in social studies curricula–organizations, methods, materials.

Educ 373 Methods in Secondary Science* (2) 
Methods, philosophy, and materials for effective science teaching in the Christian context. Principles of teaching and evaluation, course organization, the structure of science content, inquiry methods, laboratory problems, and the curricular “teaching packages.”

Educ 374 Methods in Secondary Mathematics* (2) 
Methods, philosophy, and materials for effective mathematics teaching in the Christian context. Principles of teaching and evaluating, course organization, the structure of mathematics, heuristic methods, and the newer modern programs.

Educ 375 Methods in Secondary Music* (2) 
Teaching music in the high school. A synthesis of theoretical and practical aspects of the music program and its application to present day secondary school teaching. I Sem. only.

Educ 376 Seconday PE Methods and Curriculum Design (3) 
Methodological approaches to the teaching of physical education. Special attention is devoted to the implications of growth and development of the secondary school student for program planning, instructional techniques, and the theories, principles, and practices of curriculum development. Same as HHP 376.

Educ 377 Secondary Methods in Art Education* (2) 
Philosophical and practical direction in methods and techniques used in teaching art on the high school level. Prerequisites: Art 103, 203 and 301. II Sem. only.

Educ 378 Methods in Secondary Speech/Drama* (2) 
Theory, methods, and materials for effective teaching of Speech/Drama in the secondary school. A rationale for Speech/Drama in a Lutheran high school and the state of the field education. Principles of teaching and evaluation leading from a study of the current research in communication education and theatre will be included to enable the secondary Speech/Drama teacher to develop and implement an effective Speech/Drama curriculum. II Sem. only.

Educ 379 Methods in Secondary Religion* (2) 
Exploration of teaching methodologies and curricular materials. Course organization, selection of content, methods of evaluation, the critical examination of current models of Bible study, and the role of the religion curriculum in the Lutheran high school are stressed. I Sem. only. *Secondary methods are taught the first eight weeks of the semester and generally must be completed simultaneously with Student Teaching I.

*Secondary methods are taught the first eight weeks of the semester and generally must be completed simultaneously with Student Teaching I.

Educ 380 Student Teaching in Pre-Kindergarten (10) 
Students are assigned to teach at the pre-kindergarten level under the supervision of a classroom teacher and a university supervisor. Prerequisites: Full admission to teacher education and approval of the Director of Elementary Student Teaching. P/NR.

Educ 381a/b Student Teaching I/II in the Kindergarten (4–6) 
Student teachers are assigned to specific supervisors in the level selected. Experiences on various levels are provided to the students. Students are required to take Educ 381a first. P/NR.

Educ 382a/b Student Teaching I/II in the Primary Grades (4–6) 
See description for Educ 381a/b. P/NR.

Educ 383a/b Student Teaching I/II in the Intermediate Grades (4–6) 
See description for Educ 381a/b. P/NR.

Educ 384a/b Student Teaching I/II in the Upper Grades (4–6) 
See description for Educ 381a/b. P/NR.

Educ 385a/b Student Teaching I/II in the Secondary School (4–6) 
Students are assigned to teach grades 9–12 under the direction of the supervising teacher(s) in the students’ teaching field(s). Students are required to take Educ 385a first. P/NR.

Educ 386a/b Student Teaching I/II in K–12 (Music, Art, HPE) (4–6) 
Students are assigned to teach at the elementary and secondary levels, in the area of their teaching field. Students are required to take Educ 386a first. P/NR.

Educ 387 Student Teaching in Special Education (10) 
Students are assigned to teach under the supervision of a special education teacher and a university supervisor in a special education setting. P/NR.

Educ 388 Youth Ministry Theory and Methods (3) 
A course which provides students an opportunity to reflect upon an ongoing youth ministry involvement while developing parish-based youth work competencies and enriching their cognitive understanding of youth culture, varying models of youth ministry, current synodical resources, and the theology that underlies this activity.

Educ 396a/b Student Teaching I/II Middle Level (10) 
Students are assigned to teach grades 4–9 under the direction of the supervising teacher(s) and university supervisor, in the students’ teaching field(s). P/NR.

Educ 399 ESL Student Teaching (3) 
Students are assigned to teach under the supervision of a classroom teacher and a university supervisor in settings that require application of skills and principles developed in the ESL curriculum. P/NR.

Educ 401 Middle Level Instruction (3) 
With a focus on the teaching–learning process in various content and skills areas as it pertains to middle level education, technology and resources are considered. Techniques of assessment and evaluation, classroom management, communication with parents and student advising are incorporated. Prerequisite: Educ 311, Senior standing. Sem. I only.

Educ 420 Second Language Acquisition (3)
This course builds on the introduction to second language acquisition theories received by the student in Educ 425A (English as a Second language Instruction, Curriculum, and Assessment) or Educ 367 (Methods in Secondary Modern Languages).  Through an examination of key research on questions in first and second language acquisition, this course provides a framework for the application of second language acquisition research findings to second language teaching. Prerequisites: Educ 425A, Educ 367, or special permission of the program director. 

Educ 424 Differentiated Instruction (2) 
The course will prepare teacher candidates to meet the diverse needs of ALL students, including the culturally diverse, gifted, at-risk, second language learner, and those with special needs, in inclusive educational settings. It will provide pre-service teachers an overview of special education and the federal laws which govern the education of these students today. Attention will be focused on the process of identifying the individual needs of students and creating effective teaching techniques to address those needs, primarily through the use of differentiated instruction. Prerequisites: upper-level standing, Psy 324. 12 hours of field experience required.

Educ 425A English as a Second Language/Foreign Language Instruction, Curriculum, and Assessment (3) 
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the theory and practice of ELL/foreign language learning and teaching, curriculum selection, evaluation, and development as well as assessment of English and foreign language learners. Specific topics focus on the particulars of a pluralistic society, human relational dispositions needed to teach effectively in a pluralistic society, and the variety of approaches, methods, and techniques for teaching first and second language acquisition. Prerequisites: upper-level standing.

Educ 425B English as a Second Language/Foreign Language Instruction, Curriculum, and Assessment (3) 

This course builds on EDUC 425A by continuing an exploration of principles in ESL instruction, curriculum, and assessment.  Special focus in this course is given to techniques and issues in teaching listening, speaking, reading, and writing.  The student will also be introduced to aspects of the English grammatical system that are a special challenge for ESL students and discuss ways of incorporating instruction in English grammar into instruction in the other skill areas.  In the 18-hour required practicum, students will gain experience in teaching and assessing ESL students and developing specific interventions for them. Prerequisite: Educ 425A.

Educ 430 School, Community and Parent Involvement (2) 
This course concentrates on the teacher’s role in building successful relationships between families, educators, schools and communities. Strategies for increasing respectful family–school partnerships that enhance children’s school success will be emphasized. Sem. I only. Upper-level standing.

Educ 452 Early Childhood Program Organization and Management (3) 
Organizing, planning, managing, and evaluating programs for young children. Day care and preprimary programs are the concerns of this course. Field trips to various agencies pertinent to families with young children, and experiences with families will be required. Sem. I only.

Educ 461 Literacy Instruction, Assessment and Intervention (6) 
(formerly Educ 361) Emphasizes 1) current theory, research, content, methodology, instructional materials, and classroom organization that relate to teaching the language arts (reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and visually representing); 2) informal and formal assessment that determines reader strengths and needs for purposes of instruction and intervention. A field experience of 30 clock hours in elementary school literacy development is required. Prerequisites: Educ 424, upper-level standing, full admission into teacher education.

Educ 470 Content Area Literacy (3) 
Considers the processes of reading in the various subject matter fields by which one recognizes words, copes with specialized vocabulary, comprehends, and uses printed information. Stresses the location of the student’s present reading levels, the selection of instructional techniques to fit the learning style of the student, and the choice of materials appropriate for the ability level, reading levels, and interests of the secondary student. Assists the pre-service teacher in learning how to integrate the teaching of reading skills while teaching specific content. Prerequisites: Educ 424, upper-level standing, full admission into teacher education.

Educ 480 Practicum in DCE Ministries (1.5 + 1.5) 
A course designed to expose DCE students to the history, philosophy, current research, and skills/attitudes of DCE ministry in addition to an on-site involvement with a DCE serving a congregation. Prerequisite: Admission to DCE program. (Course completed over two semesters earning 3 credit hours.)

Educ 481 Director of Christian Education Internship (12+12) 
Upon admission to the DCE Internship, a student may be assigned to a congregation for 8 weeks to 12 months, depending on previous experience and future plans. This full-time, salaried internship may begin after the junior year, and once Educ 480 has been satisfactorily completed. Course is completed over two semesters earning 24 credit hours. P/NR.

Educ 483 Leadership Development: Enabling Others to Lead and Teach (3) 
Pertinent theories, models, and strategies from the fields of management, leadership training, group process and education will be surveyed and evaluated in the light of the Biblical witness and the content of the Lutheran Confessions for possible implementation within local parishes to enable lay persons to become more effective leaders and teachers. Prerequisite: upper-level standing.

Educ 484 Confirmation Planning and Implementation (2) 
The purpose, history, and structure of confirmation in the Lutheran Church is reviewed and assessed for the purpose of structuring and outlining implementation strategies for use in a local congregation. Adult and junior confirmation programs are considered. Prerequisite: upper-level standing.

Educ 485 Parish Education Program Administration (3) 
An introduction to and exploration of the theory and processes associated with the administration of parish education programs. Special emphasis is placed on: idea generating, initiating change, leadership, promotion, evaluation, program planning, use of technology, creating ownership, explanation of pertinent systems, budget management, and curriculum review. Prerequisite: upper-level standing

Educ 488 Conflict Resolution: Coaching (3) 
This course is an introduction to conflict reconciliation with a focus upon conflict coaching. Students will gain a basic knowledge about what causes conflict including issues of perception and unhealthy or unproductive communication processes. Additionally, students will examine the theological framework for conflict resolution. Students will be challenged to explore their own responses to conflict while learning to coach others through conflicted situations. Same as CTA/Gero 488. Prerequisite: department permission

Educ 489 Conflict Resolution: Mediation II (3) 
This is an advance study in conflict reconciliation with a focus upon conflict mediation drawn from interpersonal communication theory and skill building. Students will gain basic knowledge about the mediation process in a theological framework. Students will have the opportunity to work through detailed case studies and role-plays based on actual conciliation cases. These studies and role-plays incorporate skills in listening, perception checking and paraphrasing. Students completing this course will meet requirements for foundational skills training of Peacemaker Ministries. Same as CTA/Gero 489. Prerequisite: CTA/Gero 488.

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

EDPS 210 Educational Psychology and General Methods (2) 
The essential conditions (factors) which facilitate learning and transfer; theories of learning, general and specific abilities, the importance of self-esteem, best practices in the evaluation of aptitude, achievement and other aspects of human development. 25 hours of field experience is required. Should be taken the same semester as Educ 201.

ENGLISH

Eng 101 Foundations in Writing (3) 
This course focuses on helping students develop foundational approaches and processes for writing. Students will learn basic techniques for generating ideas; giving and receiving feedback; adapting rhetorical strategies for audience and context; revising; and editing. Special attention will be given to discussing the origins and application of English language conventions and developing effective revising and editing techniques. This course is required as a prerequisite for Eng 102 for students who score below 18 on the English portion of the ACT or below 435 on the verbal portion of the SAT.

Eng 102 Experiences in Writing (3) 
This course focuses on helping students develop effective processes for writing in multiple genres, including research-based academic projects and creative works. Students will learn techniques for generating ideas; giving and receiving feedback; finding, evaluating and integrating sources; adapting rhetorical strategies for audience and context; revising; and editing. Students will also discuss the origins and application of English language conventions. Students will participate in an oral communication lab experience and adapt a research-based paper for formal presentation to the class. Prerequisite: Eng 101 for students who score below 18 on the English portion of the ACT or below 435 on the verbal portion of the SAT.

Eng 201 Introduction to Literature (3) 
A general background in the reading, interpretation, evaluation and criticism of literature in various genres.

Eng 221 Intermediate Writing (3) 
A course designed to allow students to experiment with three types of writing: fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Includes study and application of research related to peer writing groups and the process of writing. Prerequisite: Eng 102 and sophomore standing or permission of department chair.

Eng 231 Studies in the English Language (3) 
Studies in the acquisition, development, variation and science of the English language. Prerequisite: Eng 102.

Eng 300 Placement Seminar (1)  
The course includes resume and portfolio creation, attendance at professional placement seminars, mock interviews, meetings with field professionals and internship applications and searches. Prerequisite: upper level standing or permission of department chair. Also offered as CTA 300 Placement Seminar.

Eng 324 The Nebraska Story: Natural History and Writers of Nebraska’s Great Plains (3) 
A study of the Natural History of Nebraska and Nebraska authors with an interdisciplinary emphasis on science, literature, and writing. This course will include visits to selected areas of Eastern Nebraska associated with well-known Nebraska writers. Students will participate in first-hand study of the natural history of the areas and visit sites related to the literature and lives of the authors. The course will focus on the effect of the land and its history on the writers as well as on the biological and geological history of the land itself. Students’ writing and photography will be primary means of response to course materials and experience. Same as Bio 324. Prerequisites: Eng 102, Eng 201.

Eng 326 Poetry Writing (3) 
A course designed to give students the opportunity to write poetry and to read poetry from a writer’s perspective. Emphasis on contemporary poetry and poets as well as student writing, discussion of theories and application of the writing process, and the workshop approach. Prerequisite: Eng 102 and upper-level standing or permission of department chair. May not be taken simultaneously with Eng 221. Prerequisite: Eng 221.

Eng 327 Fiction Writing (3) 
A course designed to give students experience with the short story. Emphasizes the workshop approach, peer and instructor– student conferences. Students will read contemporary fiction from a writer’s perspective, examining the elements of fiction for application in their own writing. Prerequisite: Eng 221.

Eng 328 Creative Nonfiction Writing (3) 
A course designed to allow students to explore creative non-fiction, its history, and criticism of the genre. Emphasis on workshop and student writing, reading for application, and peer and student-instructor conferences. Prerequisite: Eng 221.

Eng 329 Scriptwriting (3) 
This course is designed to afford students the opportunity to explore and improve their ability to write, read, and edit scripts intended for performance. The course includes the study and application of research related to peer writing groups and the process of writing. Prerequisite: Eng 221.

Eng 341 American Literature I (3) 
A survey of significant American writers from the colonial period through the 1840s with an emphasis on the interaction of literature, history, and philosophy. Prerequisite: Eng 201.

Eng 342 American Literature II (3) 
A survey of significant American writers from the 1840s through 1910 with an emphasis on the interaction of literature, history, and philosophy. Prerequisite: Eng 201.

Eng 343 American Literature III (3) 
A survey of significant American writers from 1910 to the present with an emphasis on the interaction of literature and culture. Prerequisite: Eng 201.

Eng 361 London Literary Tour (3) 
This annual study tour opportunity occurs between December 26 and the start of the second semester. The itinerary includes London and additional selected cities in the United Kingdom and mainland Europe. Itinerary varies from year to year. Sites include the major literary, historical, and cultural areas of the selected cities. Students complete readings, a paper and project upon the return from the trip. Credit can also be substituted for a variety of other required courses in the humanities, social sciences, and other areas.

Eng 362 British Literature I (3) 
A survey of British literature from its Anglo–Saxon beginnings through the medieval and early modern eras. Prerequisite: Eng 201.

Eng 363 British Literature II (3) 
A survey of British literature from the Restoration and 18 th century through the Romantic era. Prerequisite: Eng 201.

Eng 364 British Literature III (3) 
A survey of British literature from the Victorians to the present. Prerequisite: Eng 201.

Eng 366 Shakespeare (3) 
A study of representative history plays, comedies, tragedies, and at least one problem play. Prerequisite: Eng 201.

Eng 381 World Literature I (3) 
A survey of significant literature from the ancient world, including Greek and Roman writers, on through the 1500s. The course identifies major themes addressed, major structural features advanced, and socio-cultural conditions which were contextual to this time frame. Prerequisite: Eng 201.

Eng 382 World Literature II (3) 
A survey of significant literature primarily from the early 1600s into the mid 1800s, including the Enlightenment and Renaissance eras. The course identifies major themes addressed by representative writers of the European tradition, as well as additional world cultures. Several Genres explored. Prerequisite: Eng 201.

Eng 383 Modern Poetry (3) 
Study of twentieth century poetry. While the emphasis is on American and British poets, some opportunity exists for examination of poetry from other cultures. Techniques and philosophy of twentieth century poetry. Prerequisite: Eng 201.

Eng 384 World Literature III (3) 
A survey of significant literature from a variety of world cultures from the late 1800s into the early 21 st century. Included are representative writers from the modern and post-modern eras in developed countries and the developing world. Structural experimentation in these literary works is also explored. Prerequisite: Eng 201.

Eng 385 Psychological and Sociological Analysis of Modern Literature (3) 
Study of the twentieth century novel. While the emphasis is on American, British, and continental novelists, some opportunity exists for examination of novels from other cultures. Trends and social implications. Literary analysis and critical essays. Prerequisite: Eng 201. Same as Psy 385.

Eng 387 Modern and Postmodern Drama (3) 
Study of twentieth century drama. While the emphasis is on American, British, and continental dramatists, some opportunity exists for examination of drama from other cultures. Religious, social, and moral ideas expressed in these plays. Prerequisite: Eng 201.

Eng 391 Children’s Literature (3) 
A study of literature for children from picture books to elementary-age works. Methods of presenting literature for enjoyment and enlargement of experiences. Prerequisite: Eng 201 and sophomore standing or permission of department chair.

Eng 392 Reading Interests of Adolescents (3) 
Reading and discussion of literature appropriate for adolescents. Emphasis on young adult literature. Insights into using literature in the classroom. Prerequisite: Eng 201 and sophomore standing or permission of department chair.

Eng 399 Independent Study 
Hours and topics by arrangement. Prerequisite: Eng 201.

Eng 411 History and Literature of Aging (3) 
See Gero 411.

Eng 412 Life Review, Autobiography and Creative Non-Fiction (3) 
See Gero 412.

Eng 431 English Language and Linguistics (3) 
An intensive exploration of the science of language as it is discussed in socio-linguistics, psycholinguistics and historical linguistics. Course includes study of grammar and linguistic philosophy. Prerequisite: Eng 231 and one upper-level English course or permission of department chair.

Eng 491 Issues in Literature for Children and Youth(3) 
A survey of contemporary literature for readers from middle level through grade 12. Students will become familiar with contemporary youth poetry and fiction, explore societal issues in literature and develop skills of literary analysis.

Eng 498 Honors Course 
Arranged for qualified seniors.

Eng 499 Internship 
Students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship packet and review the required process.

ENGLISH, COMMUNICATION, THEATRE ARTS

ECTA 150 Basic Special Topics in English, Communication and Theatre [Topic by Announcement] (1-3) 
This course offers students the opportunity to take classes in special topic areas in writing, communication, and theatre. Courses are offered in rotation by faculty members with interest and experience in the special topic area. Topics announced In the semester before their offering. Students may take multiple topic areas as appropriate to fulfill elective hours.

ECTA 250 Intermediate Special Topics in English, Communication and Theatre [Topic by Announcement] (1-3) 
This course offers students the opportunity to take classes in special topic areas in writing, communication, and theatre. Courses are offered in rotation by faculty members with interest and experience in the special topic area. Topics announced in the semester before their offering. Students may take multiple topic areas as appropriate to fulfill elective hours. Prerequisite: ECTA 102 and one additional course in CTA or English.

ECTA 350 Special Topics in English, Communication and Theatre [Topic by Announcement] (2–3) 
This course offers students the opportunity to take classes in special topic areas in writing, communication, and theatre. Courses are offered in rotation by faculty members with interest and experience in the special topic area. Topics announced in the semester before their offering. Students may take multiple topic areas as appropriate to fulfill elective hours. Prerequisite: ECTA 102 and one additional course in CTA or English.

ECTA 450 Special Topics in English, Communication and Theatre [Topic by Announcement] (2–3) 
This course offers students the opportunity to take classes in special topic areas in writing, communication, and theatre. Courses are offered in rotation by faculty members with interest and experience in the special topic area. Topics announced in the semester before their offering. Students may take multiple topic areas as appropriate to fulfill elective hours. Prerequisite: ECTA 102 and one additional course in CTA or English. 

ECTA 499 Special Topics in the Study of Language (1-3)
This course analyzes and evaluates the privileged space language holds in the related humanities disciplines of English, speech communication and theatre studies. Students will write, speak and perform individual projects in response to interdisciplinary and shared, cross-disciplinary readings that explore the foundations of literary study, rhetorical study and theatre.

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

ESci 281 Physical Geography and Geology (4) 
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. See Geog 281.

ESci 291 Geography of Sports and Outdoor Recreation (3) 
See Geog 291.

ESci 315 Environmental Science (3) 
See Geog 315.

ESci 320 Natural Resource Management and Conservation in the National Parks (3) 
See Geog 320.

ESci 351 Environmental Law and Policy (3) 
This course examines the key environmental laws, policies, and regulatory agencies of the United States. These are examined to provide a historical context as well as a contemporary understanding of environmental decision making at the federal, state, and local level.

ESci 361 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3) 
Lecture 1, Lab 2. See Geog 361.

ESci 36_ Ecology and Natural History Study Tours (3) 
See Bio 36_.

ESci 377 Conservation Biology (3) 
See Bio 377.

ESci 385 Introduction to GPS (3) 
See Geog 385.

ESci 461 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3) 
See Geog 461.

ESci 498 Environmental Science Internship (1–3) 
Students gain experience in environmental science by working in an internship position under the supervision of a professional in the field. Prerequisites: minimum junior standing and permission from social science, natural science, or business faculty. Students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate/practicum packet and review the required process.

FAMILY LIFE (For Degree Completion Program Students Only)

FL 221 Lifespan Development (3) 
A study of the development of changes of the person through the individual and family life cycle. Each stage of the cycle will consider physical development, including body changes and motor skills; cognitive development, including thought and language; psycho-social development, including emotions, personality and relationships with other people; spiritual development, including spiritual formation and implications for family life ministry

FL 428 Parent Education (3) 
Examines lifespan faith and moral development of children and parents; characteristics, types, styles and forces that shape parenting practices and processes; development and dynamics of life-span relationships; changing family contexts; programs/services, training and delivery systems; and the impact of cultural-religious norms and family policies upon families.

FL 433 Aging and the Family (3) 
This course provides a lifespan view of aging as individuals and within families. Theoretical frameworks, physiological, psychological, social aspects of aging, public policy and topical issues of families and individuals across time are studied. Students review community agencies, retirement-long-term-care campuses and independent living contexts in their communities, congregations and schools and study ethical issues and ministry opportunities and applications in a variety of contexts.

FL 440 Family Resource Management (3) 
This course is a study of the effective management of family resources that relate to lifespan family and individual goals. Values, attitudes, goals and resources are reviewed in light of a biblical foundation, management theories, concepts and principles and communication skills. Management of family time, work, stress, finances, consumerism and the environment provide a knowledge base and decision-making skills for planning, implementing and evaluating change for lifespan decision-making.

FL 443 Theory and Dynamics of Family Relations (3) 
A study of the theological framework of the family and family relations. An examination of contemporary theories used in family analysis and a study of social, psychological and spiritual influences on family interaction, with special emphasis on how intra-family processes and familial interaction in the social milieu are related to personal and family functioning.

FL 444 Lifespan Family Education (3) 
This course reviews the nature of lifespan family life education in the community, workplace and church. Students become familiar with professional and faith perspectives related to the foundation and practice of major lifespan family areas. Personal and professional family life assumptions and values are examined. Immediate course applicability is possible through pre-and-post work.

FL 445 Foundations of Christian Marriage and Family (3) 
A study of the foundation of marriage and family within the framework of Christian Theology and praxis. Includes the history of marriage and family, contributions to and development of the field in divorce prevention, remarriage, divorce recovery; current theories and approaches to training in CPREP: The Christian Prevention and Relationship Enhancement Program and/or PREPARE/ENRICH certification or re-certification among others.

FL 446 Family Dysfunctions: Assessment and Intervention (3) 
Covers the etiology and interventions of emotional and behavioral dysfunctions from a family systems perspective and a Christian theological framework. Provides community counselors with assessment intervention tools designed to help church professionals in topical areas to gambling, chemical, Internet addictions, anger management and other abuses found in family and community networks.

FL 447 Family Law and Public Policy (3) 
Basic foundations and knowledge base of family law are studied. Students review their family state laws regarding legal rights of marriage-dissolution, children, family support, child custody, protection, public policies and implications for the church and school. This self-study course includes meetings, conferences with community attorneys, law enforcement agencies and courtroom observations.

FL 483 Sexuality and the Family (3) 
This course develops a Christian lifespan approach to healthy sexuality; focusing on attachment theory, dating, mate selection, marriage and family development. Sexual attitudes, values and belief systems, and responsible behaviors within the church, community and larger society are identified. Lifespan curricula and models are examined.

FL 485 Family Life Ministry (3) 
This course is a study of various models and strategies useful for initiating and sustaining family ministry as a lifelong process in the context of the home and local congregation. Emphasis is placed on Theology and philosophy of family ministry, currents in family change, families in ministry, family life programmatic areas, and curricula for family life educational ministry and skill development.

FINANCIAL LITERACY

FINL 100 Financial Literacy I (0–0.5) 
Personal financial stewardship as it relates to students, specifically regarding the topics of budgeting, credit cards, student loans, and debt management. To be completed during a student’s first year at Concordia. Note: Passing this course with 0 credits meets one of Concordia’s graduation requirements. Taking the course for 0.5 credits may be beneficial in accumulating 128 credits, or in establishing full-time status. Taking the course for 0 credits may help a student who is already at 18 credits avoid paying extra for this course.

FINL 400 Financial Literacy II (0–0.5) 
Personal financial stewardship as it relates to students, specifically regarding the topics of budgeting, insurance and investments. To be completed during a student’s final year at Concordia. Note: Passing this course with 0 credits meets one of Concordia’s graduation requirements. Taking the course for 0.5 credits may be beneficial in accumulating 128 credits, or in establishing full-time status. Taking the course for 0 credits may help a student who is already at 18 credits avoid paying extra for this course.

FIRST YEAR SEMINAR

FYS 101 First-Year Seminar (1) 
This course is designed to help first-year students make successful transitions to college student life. Students will examine what others have to say about the purpose and culture of contemporary higher education and will explore the opportunities for intellectual, academic, social and spiritual growth they face as a Concordia freshman. Each section will include a service learning project. Through reading, discussion and writing, students will reflect on the ways their own values, beliefs, goals and learning styles may affect their experiences as students and their professional and vocational paths

GEOGRAPHY

Geog 101 Introduction to Human Geography (3)
This course examines the many human and cultural aspects found throughout the world.  It focuses on the spatial distribution and interrelationships of language, religion, geopolitics, population, urbanization, health and disease, migration, conservation, and economic development.    

Geog 202 World Regional Geography (3) 
This course is designed to provide a broad overview of the major regions of the world with emphasis on the increasing interconnectedness of people and places due to the influence of globalization on world trade, travel, communication, culture, and the natural environment.

Geog 281 Physical Geography and Geology (4) 
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. Introduction to the climactic and physical processes shaping the Earth’s crust and the interrelationship between humans and the natural environment. Students will learn through the interpretation of maps and remotely sensed imagery, laboratory activities, and a multi–day field trip. Same as ESci 281 and Sci 281. Course Fee.

Geog 291 Geography of Sports and Outdoor Recreation (3) 
Sports and outdoor recreation are extremely important components of American life and are multi-billion dollar industries. Where and why these activities take place is very geographic; this course examines the spatial distribution of sports and outdoor recreation in the United States. Students will utilize GIS mapping software and other Internet-based mapping programs to examine the distribution of different types of sports and outdoor activities, conduct research on select topics, learn from guest speakers, and participate in fieldwork. Same as ESci 291.

Geog 311 Geography of North America (3) 
A systematic analysis of major themes of North American geography with emphasis on problems such as energy and environment. Includes regional analyses of the United States and Canada that carefully examines their physical background and cultural trends. Prerequisite: Geog 101 or 102, or permission of instructor.

Geog 315 Environmental Science (3) 
This course provides a broad introduction to the field of environmental science. Topics include global warming, energy issues, food and agriculture, biofuels, pollution, wildlife management and conservation, human population, and natural systems. Same as ESci 315 and Sci 315.

Geog 320 Resource Management in the National Parks (3) 
Course provides students with a practical, field-based experience with contemporary resource management and conservation 101 issues in units of the National Park Service. Topics include historical development of individual parks and the entire NPS, visitor impacts, park planning, resource policy, exotic plant and animal species, wildlife management, in-park transportation concerns, public safety, and wilderness management. Students will visit and camp in selected national parks. Same as ESci 320.

Geog 331 Geography of Europe (3) 
This course provides a detailed examination of the historic and contemporary geography of Europe. Special focus is placed upon contemporary issues relating to the formation and governance of the European Union, immigration, world trade, geopolitics, environmentalism, and foreign relations.

Geog 341 Geography of Asia (3) 
This course provides a contemporary examination of the geography of Eastern and Southern Asia. Through the use of current events, readings, and multi-media, students examine the rising influence of this region on world trade, commerce, globalization, foreign relations, geopolitics, and the natural environment.

Geog 345 Geography and Archaeology of the Holy Land (3) 
Provides an introduction to the archaeology of Syria–Palestine, the interaction between human occupation and geography, and the importance of archaeological research in understanding the Bible through detailed study of primary and secondary sources.

Geog 361 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (3) 
Lec. 1, Lab 2. This course provides in introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology through the use of ESRIs ArcGIS software. Students gain a working knowledge of GIS software and how it is used in various disciplines via laboratory exercises, lecture, guest speakers, and a class project. Same as ESci 361.

Geog 371 Economic Geography (3) 
Spatial characteristics of people and their economic activities. Both historical–inductive and theoretical–deductive explanations are given for spatial location of primary, secondary and tertiary activities. Recommended: prior economics or geography.

Geog 381 Meteorology and Oceanography (3) 
An introduction to the properties and processes of the atmosphere and the world ocean. In addition, emphasis will be placed on the application of recent scientific advances in these related fields and how they affect the world we live in. Same as Sci 381.

Geog 385 Introduction to GPS (3) 
Course provides students with an introduction to the Global Positioning System (GPS). Students will learn the history of GPS, how the system operates, and how it can be used in a variety of disciplines and professions. Students conduct a variety of exercises and research projects utilizing GPS functionality and integrating it with GIS and other Internet-based mapping programs such as Google Earth. Same as Sci 385.

Geog 391 Urban Geography (3) 
The spatial evaluation of cities; including the history, site and situation, external relations, internal characteristics, the rise of urban centers, comparative aspects of cities, their present development and urban problems are examined. Prerequisite: Geog 101 or 102, or permission of instructor.

Geog 461 Advanced Geographic Information Systems (3) 
A study of the functionality and application of geographic information systems technology that builds upon the skills learned in Introduction to Geographic Information Systems. Students will learn spatial model building, geodatabase management, georeferencing, and spatial data collection and analysis. Same as ESci 461. Prerequisite: ESci/Geog 361.

Geog 490 Capstone Seminar (3) 
The capstone seminar provides students with the opportunity to integrate and apply learning from their entire college experience. Students will develop and complete a project in conjunction with the course instructor or other approved mentor. Approved projects will require students to use skills, methodology and knowledge to address important issues, explore key arguments, and critique common practices germane to their academic discipline. Internships and fieldwork experiences may also be acceptable projects. The course will also prepare students for the transition from college to graduate/professional school. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

GERONTOLOGY

Gero 205 Adult Development and Aging (3) 
This course provides students with an overview of adult lifespan development from a psychological and communicative perspective as well as an introduction to aging studies overall. The course is offered as an elective to students in BA programs and to students in gerontology areas. 

Gero 400 Issues in Gerontology and Aging Studies (3) 
This course provides students with an overview of issues and research in human and aging services. Course includes basics of reading and using research in the students’ areas of specialization.

Gero 401 Health Aspects of Aging (3) 
This course is designed to develop and expand knowledge and skill to understand and address contemporary health issues in aging. Prerequisite: Gero 205. Same as HHP 401.

Gero 402 Social Gerontology (3) 
Social gerontology is the study of the nonphysical aspects of human aging and includes the psychological, social psychological and social aspects of aging. Social gerontology integrates scientific knowledge about social policy and professional practice into the knowledge base created by basic social scientific research. Course includes a review of principles of gerontological research selecting of topics from ageism, theories of development, family and relational networks, sexuality and gender, retirement and financial issues related to social development, and aging and economics. Prerequisite: Gero 205. 

Gero 403 Mental Health and Aging (3) 
This course will provide students with a comprehensive study of mental health issues associated with aging. Issues include: depression, dementia and the management of lifelong conditions in later life. Prerequisite: Gero 205. 

Gero 404 Faith Development & Later Life (3) 
This course introduces students to issues, concerns and research in the spiritual development of individuals as they age. The course supplements sociological, biological and psychological theories of lifespan development and explores issues of aging and ministry. Prerequisite: Gero 205.

Gero 411 History and Literature of Aging (3) 
This course explores historical, social and literary depictions/understandings of aging in Western and non-Western cultures with an eye toward a richer understanding of what it means to age in the world today. Same as Eng 411 and Hist 411.

Gero 412 Life Review, Autobiography and Creative Non-Fiction (3) 
This course explores the theoretical concept and value of life review while researching and developing techniques in the writing of autobiography and creative non-fiction. Same as Eng 412.

Gero 413 Aging and Communication (3) 
This course examines lifespan communication issues including: intergenerational issues in media and marketing, lifespan language and communication development, intercultural communication and lifespan, caregiver/receiver communication and intergenerational relationship development. 

Gero 414 Aging Policy, Programs & Services (3) 
This course surveys contemporary policies, programs and services throughout the lifespan including the aging services network.

Gero 415 Retirement & Lifespan Financial Issues (3) 
This course explores the impacts of an aging society on financial planning and retirement. Students will study in-depth issues in lifespan financial planning. Same as Bus 415.

Gero 417 Aging and the Brain (3) 
This course explores the biological development of the human brain throughout the lifespan and examines the biological changes underlying common age-related neuropathies. Same as Bio 417.

Gero 418 Nutrition & the Older Adult (3) 
This course examines in depth, the importance of nutrition across the lifespan with specific attention to the particular nutritional needs of older adults.

Gero 419 Death, Dying and Trauma (3) 
This course examines the processes, theories and responses to individual and collective trauma, the processes and tasks of dying and the issues of death and bereavement.

Gero 420 Long-Term Care Administration (3) 
Overview of the functional organizational structure in long-term care facilities and the core competencies for nursing home administration as set by the National Association of Boards of Long term care. Provides an introduction to and application of relevant local, state, and federal laws and regulatory standards. Addresses significant resident and family resources, quality resident care, and financial management.

Gero 421 Events and Activities Management (3) 
This course reviews strategies and philosophies in event planning and activity management for organizations and businesses. A special emphasis is given to creating educational, intergenerational and elder family programming and services.

Gero 422 Intergenerational Programming and Activities (3) 
This course is an overview of issues and options in planning programs and activities for intergenerational groups.

Gero 423 Geriatric Counseling (3) 
This course is an introduction to the treatment modalities and approaches to counseling older adults.

Gero 425 Complementary Therapies (3) 
Applied theory and practice to support the use of complementary and alternative therapies with conventional therapies. Students learn to educate their clients about the complementary and alternative techniques for reducing pain such as focused breathing and relaxation, massage, guided imagery, music, humor, and distraction, as well as medication therapy used for reducing pain (conventional therapy).

Gero 426 Parish Nursing (3) 
Designed to understand the Parish nurse's role in the health care, community, and congregational settings. Emphasis is placed on spiritual care, integration of faith and health, health education, professional counsel, volunteer training and advocacy.

Gero 427 Theories and Applications in Nursing Informatics (3) 
Theory and application of health information technology. Includes training in the use of health care technology and an introduction to trends and future trends in health informatics.

Gero 430 Issues of Aging and Longevity for Health Professionals (3) 
Develops the student's knowledge of normal aging and nursing skills critical to the care of older adults. Includes issues related to the aging client in the community and the challenges of healthcare issues confronted by aging clients. Emphasis is on caring for the older adult and providing health promotion, disease prevention, illness care, restoration, rehabilitation, health counseling, education, spiritual care, and client advocate. Incorporate safe practicum experiences with effective decision making within community or healthcare setting. Prerequisite: Lifespan Development or related course/demonstrated proficiency.

Gero 488 Conflict Resolution: Coaching (3) 
See Educ 488.

Gero 489 Conflict Resolution: Mediation II (3) 
See Educ 489.

Gero 498 Special Topics in Aging (3) 
This course examines special issues in aging and gerontology. Topics are specific to the needs of students in the topic area and expertise of the instructor.

Gero 499 Practicum (3) 
The practicum requires students to conduct programmatic research and implement an aging services project in their area of professional interest. Students must interview with and gain permission from the program director before enrolling.

GLOBAL MULTICULTURAL

GMC 380 Special Topics in Culture and Ministry in Latvia (2) 
AThis course will explore Latvia, its people, historical and political developments, sociological structures, modern economic and business progress, ecclesiastical arena and ministry opportunities. The major experience for this course is a visit to Latvia to meet the people, engage in dialog with Latvians and explore their culture, modern and historical. This trip occurs over Thanksgiving break.

GMC 390 Self-Direct Study (2) 
Student engages in a self-directed exploration of a global or multicultural context relevant to his or her major or area of study. Students will develop a project working with the Go World Resource Center and work directly with a faculty member on specific readings and other assignments to meet course objectives and learning goals. Permission of instructor required.

GREEK

Grk 101 Greek I (4) 
An introduction to the grammar, vocabulary, and syntax of Attic and Koine Greek. Simple passages of prose will be read. Five hours per week.

Grk 201 Greek II (4) 
A continuation of Grk 101. Selected passages for reading. Five hours per week. Prerequisite: Grk 101 or equivalent.

Grk 301 Greek III (3) 
An intensive review of Koine morphology, vocabulary, principle parts and grammar. The Gospel of John will be translated. Prerequisite: Grk 201 or equivalent.

Grk 401 Greek IV (3) 
The synoptic Gospels of the Greek New Testament will be read intensively and analyzed from the point of view of grammar, vocabulary and syntax. Prerequisite: Grk 301 or equivalent.

Grk 410 Acts (3) 
Reading the book of Acts with an emphasis on a close examination of grammatical and syntactical features. Prerequisite: Grk 401 or equivalent.

Grk 420 Pauline Epistles (3) 
Extensive readings in the epistles of St. Paul with an emphasis on the grammatical and syntactical features as well as the distinctive features of an epistle. Prerequisite: Grk 401.

Grk 430 Textual Criticism and Intertestamental Relationships (3) 
An introduction to textual criticism of the Hebrew OT and the Greek NT, and a study of the linguistic and theological interrelationship of the testaments, particularly the use of the Septuagint by NT writers. This course is to be taken in the final year. Prerequisites: Grk 201 and Heb 201. Same as Heb 440.

HEALTH AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE

ACTIVITY COURSES

HHP 100 Lifetime Wellness (1) 
A course designed to provide an understanding of the values of wellness in our contemporary society and to aid the student in developing a personalized wellness program for optimal health. Course fee.

TEAM ACTIVITY COURSES

HHP 111 Flag Football (.5) 
Half semester.

HHP 112 Lacrosse (.5) 
Half semester.

HHP 116 Basketball (.5) 
Half semester.

HHP 117 Soccer (.5) 
Half semester.

HHP 118 Softball (.5) 
Half semester.

HHP 132 Volleyball (.5) 
Half semester.

LEISURE/ADVENTURE ACTIVITY COURSES

HHP 142 Orienteering (.5) 
Half semester. Development of map and compass skills.

HHP 144 Recreational Sports (.5) 
Half semester. Includes horseshoes, bocce ball, eclipseball and other activities.

HHP 146 Adventure and Cooperative Activities (.5) 
Half semester. Challenge and trust–building activities including low ropes elements.

HHP 147 Alpine Skiing **(.5) 
A spring break course. An extra fee will be assessed.

HHP 148 Beginning Climbing (.5) 
Half semester. A course in beginning wall climbing. An equipment use fee will be assessed.

HHP 149 Wilderness Adventure Activities **(.5) 
A summer school course. Activities may include mountain climbing, backpacking, hiking, mountain biking, rafting, canoeing. An extra fee will be assessed.

INDIVIDUAL/DUAL ACTIVITY COURSES

HHP 135 Track and Field (.5) 
Half semester.

HHP 140 Long Distance Cycling (1) 
Contact HHP Department Chair for information and permission.

HHP 152 Badminton (.5) 
Half semester.

HHP 154 Golf** (.5) 
Half semester.

HHP 156 Tennis (.5) 
Half semester.

HHP 157 Bowling** (.5) 
Half semester. Course fee.

HHP 158 Racquetball ** (.5) 
Half semester. Course fee.

DANCE ACTIVITY COURSES

HHP 153 Folk Dance (.5) 
Half semester.

HHP 155 Square and Line Dance (.5) 
Half semester

FITNESS ACTIVITY COURSES

HHP 161 Aerobic Walking/Jogging (.5) 
Half semester

HHP 162 Aquatic Fitness (.5) 
Half semester

HHP 164 Cross Training (.5) 
Half semester

HHP 166 Weight Training (.5) 
Half semester.

HHP 168 Aerobics (.5) 
Half semester. May include step, kickboxing, and the different components to a group of aerobic workout. A considerable amount of physical exertion is involved so the course is for students with no apparent health risks.

AQUATICS ACTIVITY COURSES

HHP 171 Swimming – Level I (.5) 
Half semester.

HHP 172 Swimming – Level II (.5) 
Half semester. Prerequisite: HHP 171.

HHP 173 Swimming – Level III (.5) 
Half semester. Prerequisite: HHP 172.

HHP 174 Swimming – Level IV (.5) 
Half semester. Prerequisite: HHP 173.

HHP 175 Swimming – Level V (.5) 
Half semester. Prerequisite: HHP 174.

HHP 176 Swimming – Level VI (.5) 
Half semester. Prerequisite: HHP 175.

HHP 177 Swimming – Level VII (.5) 
Half semester. Prerequisite: HHP 176. **A special fee will be assessed.

THEORY COURSES

HHP 181 Elements of Health (3) 
Designed to expose prospective health education and promotion professionals to the basic content areas of comprehensive health education, as well as the fundamental concepts, models, theories, and strategies pertaining to health education and promotion. Prerequisite: HHP 100.

HHP 182 First Aid and CPR (2) 
Safety, prevention of injuries, and first aid and CPR procedures as outlined by the American Red Cross. Course fee.

HHP 228 Programs in Individual, Dual, and Team Sports (3) 
Students will use current teaching models to learn and evaluate age appropriate teaching progressions and assessment techniques of individual sports (e.g., track and field, golf, and bowling), dual sports (e.g., tennis, badminton, and racquetball) and team sports (e.g., basketball, soccer, volleyball). Students will become proficient in both performing and teaching specific skills related to the sports. Prerequisite: sophomore status or higher.

HHP 238 Programs in Rhythms and Dance (1) 
Performance and analysis of fundamental movements and skills in rhythmic activities and dance (folk, square, line, and social). The role of rhythms and dance programs for various developmental levels. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or higher.

HHP 248 Programs in Leisure and Adventure Activities (1) 
Performance and analysis of fundamental movements and skills in leisure and adventure activities. The role of leisure and adventure programs for various developmental levels. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or higher.

HHP 261 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries (2) 
Intended to equip the student with sufficient knowledge and skill in the prevention, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries common to athletic activities. Course fee.

HHP 270 Human Performance Laboratory Techniques (2) 
This course introduces students to the function and use of a variety of human performance equipment. Topics will center on the application of the equipment in health and human performance.

HHP 273 Motor Learning and Development (2) 
The analysis of research findings and empirical evidence concerning the learning of motor skills, with emphasis on synthesizing these materials into useful concepts which will aid the practitioner. Provides a knowledge base in the study of changes in motor behavior across the lifespan, the processes that underlie these changes and the factors that affect them.

HHP 281 Health Topics: Drug Education (1) 
A course in the health topics series designed to develop and expand knowledge and skill to understand and address the issues of drug/substance use, misuse and abuse. Prerequisite: HHP 100.

HHP 283 Health Topics: Consumer Health (1) 
A course in the health topics series designed to develop and expand knowledge and skill to understand and address consumer health issues. In addition, it will better enable consumers to make informed decisions regarding the selection and use of health products and services. Prerequisite: HHP 100 or concurrent enrollment.

HHP 284 Health Topics: Stress Management (1) 
A course in the health topics series designed to develop and expand knowledge and skill in comprehensive stress management. Strategies and techniques for the individual and the health educator will be presented.

HHP 285 Health Topics: Nutrition (1)
A course in the health topics series designed to develop and expand knowledge and skill to understand and address the issues of nutrition, dietary patterns and weight management. Prerequisite: HHP 100.

HHP 286 Health Topics: Men’s Health (1) 
A course in the health topics series designed to develop and expand knowledge and skill to understand and address contemporary issues in men’s health. Prerequisite: HHP 100 or concurrent enrollment.

HHP 287 Health Topics: Women’s Health (1) 
A course in the health topics series designed to develop and expand knowledge and skill to understand and address contemporary issues in women’s health. Prerequisite: HHP 100 or concurrent enrollment. Additional conference fee required.

HHP 288 Health Topics: Health and Aging (1) 
A course in the health topics series designed to develop and expand knowledge and skill to understand and address contemporary health issues in aging. Prerequisite: HHP 100 or concurrent enrollment.

HHP 289 Health Topics: Violence and Injury Prevention (1) 
A course in the health topics series designed to develop and expand knowledge and skill to understand and address contemporary issues concerning violence and injury prevention. Prerequisite: HHP 100 or concurrent enrollment.

HHP 290 Health Psychology (3) 
Health Psychology is the study of how biology, behavior, and social context influence health and illness. The course will examine the contributions of psychological research to the understanding, prevention, and treatment of a variety of health concerns. The biopsychosocial–spiritual model will be emphasized, which entails the study of how social, emotional, behavioral, biological, and spiritual factors influence health. The specific topics may include injury, stress, pain management, addictions, patient–physician/practitioner relations, and chronic illnesses such as Alzheimer's, diabetes, and AIDS. Prerequisite: Psy 101. Same as Psy 290.

HHP 291 Foundations of Human Performance (2) 
An introduction to the scope of human performance professions. Emphasis on the formation of a sound philosophy for a professional in the field. 15 hours of field experience required. Prerequisite: HHP 100.

HHP 292 Foundations of Recreation & Sport (2)
An introduction to the scope of recreation and sport professions. Emphasis on the formation of a sound philosophy for a professional in the field. 15 hours of field experience required. Prerequisite: HHP 100.

HHP 295 Psychology of Exercise (3)
This course will cover: (a) psychological theories for understanding and predicting health-oriented exercise behavior; (b) psychological and psychobiological responses to exercise; (c) psychological interventions for increasing exercise participation and adherence. Prerequisite: Psy 101. Same as Psy 295.

HHP 298 Theory of Coaching (2) 
This course provides an overview of coaching sports. It is designed for the student to develop a coaching philosophy and understand coaching techniques, the importance of communication in various interactions, psychology of sports and athletic competition, logistical planning, physical development of athletes, and motivation in sports.

HHP 312 Exercise Prescription (3) 
This course is designed to assist students in the identification, analysis, and implementation of exercise protocols that are appropriate for the specific needs of a variety of individuals. The special needs of those exercising in varying environments will also be covered. Prerequisite: HHP/Bio 385, Bio 343 or 344.

HHP 321 Coaching of Football (2) 
Designed to prepare the student for coaching by studying principles which control or influence the game of football. Prerequisite: HHP 111 or instructor’s approval.

HHP 322 Coaching of Men’s and Women’s Basketball (2) 
A study of basketball with special emphasis on the skills necessary for coaching. Prerequisite: HHP 116 or instructor’s approval.

HHP 323 Coaching of Softball/Baseball (2) 
Designed to prepare the student for coaching softball/baseball through classroom theory and laboratory experience. Prerequisite: HHP 118 or instructor's approval.

HHP 324 Coaching of Wrestling (2) 
The purpose of this course is to provide the student with the knowledge, skills, and abilities that will enable him or her to function as a successful wrestling coach.

HHP 325 Coaching of Men’s and Women’s Track (2) 
A thorough study of track and field events, their rules, order, and the latest trends in training and coaching techniques. Prerequisite: HHP 135 or instructor’s approval.

HHP 326 Coaching of Soccer (2) 
Designed to prepare the student for coaching soccer through classroom theory and laboratory experience. Prerequisite: HHP 117 or instructor’s approval.

HHP 327 Coaching of Volleyball (2) 
Designed to prepare the student for coaching volleyball through classroom theory techniques and laboratory experience. Prerequisite: HHP 132 or instructor’s approval.

HHP 362 Internship in Coaching (2–3) 
An experience designed to provide opportunities to observe and work with a professional in a student's selected sport. The internship must be done in a sport other than the one chosen in HHP 322–327. Prerequisite: HHP 463 and upper-level standing. Students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship packet and review the required process.

HHP 363 Health Methods in Elementary Education (1) 
Designed for elementary candidates who are not completing a health education concentration or minor. Emphasis is on both the theory and practical demonstration of how to develop a health curriculum and how to teach the curriculum to elementary and middle level students. Prerequisite: HHP 100 and upper-level standing.

HHP 364 Physical Education Methods in Elementary Education (1) 
Designed for elementary candidates who are not completing a physical education concentration or minor. Emphasis is on both the theory and practical demonstration of how to develop a physical education curriculum and how to teach the curriculum to elementary and middle level students. A field experience of 10 clock hours is required. Prerequisite: HHP 100 and upper-level standing.

HHP 365 Physical Education in Elementary and Middle Level Education (2) 
A study of methods, materials, curriculum development and evaluation of physical education programs in elementary and middle level education. Prerequisite: HHP 100, 291, and upper-level standing. 15 hours of field experience required. Same as Educ 365.

HHP 366 Health Methods and Curriculum Design (3) 
A study of methods, materials, curriculum development, and evaluation of health education programs in the school. Prerequisite: HHP 181 and upper-level standing. Same as Educ 366.

HHP 367 Recreational Programming (3)
The principles and practices of conducting recreational programs for schools, churches, community organizations, and various populations. Emphasis will be on non-sport related recreation programming with administrative and leadership roles being stressed. Prerequisite: upper-level standing.

HHP 369 Senior Seminar in Recreation & Sport Studies (1)
A capstone course that allows students to integrate knowledge, experience and research in the exploration of professional issues and trends in recreation and sport. Prerequisite: senior standing.

HHP 376 Secondary PE Methods and Curriculum Design(3) 
Methodological approaches to the teaching of physical education. Special attention is devoted to the implications of growth and development of the secondary school student for program planning, instructional techniques, and the theories, principles, and practices of curriculum development. Same as Educ 376.

HHP 379 Senior Seminar in K-12 HPE (1) 
A capstone course that allows students to integrate knowledge, experience and research in the exploration of professional issues and trends in health and physical education. Prerequisite: senior standing

HHP 385 Physiology of Exercise (3) 
Same as Bio 385.

HHP 389 Senior Seminar in Health (1) 
A capstone course that allows students to integrate knowledge, experience and research in the exploration of professional issues and trends in health education and promotion. Prerequisite: senior standing.

HHP 390 Internship in Recreation (3)
A planned, supervised experience which integrates knowledge and practical experience in a setting appropriate to the student’s professional goals. Prerequisite: Upper-level standing and consent of department chair. Students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/ practicum packet and review the required process.

HHP 391 Internship in Sports Ministry (3) 
A planned, supervised experience which integrates knowledge and practical experience in a setting appropriate to the student's professional goals. Prerequisite: Upper-level standing and consent of department chair. Students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and review the required process.

HHP 392 Internship in Fitness Studies (3) 
A planned, supervised experience which integrates knowledge and practical experience in a setting appropriate to the student’s professional goals. Prerequisite: Upper-level standing and consent of department chair. Students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and review the required process. May be repeated for additional credit.

HHP 393 Internship in Senior Adult Fitness (3) 
A planned, supervised experience which integrates knowledge and practical experience in a setting appropriate to the student’s professional goals. Prerequisite: Upper-level standing and consent of department chair. Students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and review the required process. May be repeated for additional credit.

HHP 394 Internship in Sport Communication (3) 
An experience designed to provide opportunities to observe and work with professionals in the student’s selected field. Prerequisites: upper-level standing with completion of at least 60 hours of course work with a minimum of 15 hours in the major and approval of the instructor and the HHP department chair. Students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and review required process. May be repeated for additional credit.

HHP 395 Biomechanics (3) 
A study of human movement. Attention is given to the anatomy of muscles, bones, joints. Application of mechanical principles to the movement of the human organism. Prerequisite: upper-level standing; Bio 243 or 343, Phys 109.

HHP 396 Internship in Recreation & Sport Management (3) 
A planned, supervised experience which integrates knowledge and practical experience in a setting appropriate to the student’s professional goals. Prerequisite: Upper-level standing and consent of department chair. Students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and review the required process. May be repeated for additional credit.

HHP 397 Internship in Exercise Science (3) 
A planned, supervised experience which integrates knowledge and practical experience in a setting appropriate to the student’s professional goals. Prerequisite: Upper-level standing and consent of department chair. Students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and review the required process. May be repeated for additional credit.

HHP 398 Internship in Community Health (3) 
A planned, supervised experience which integrates knowledge and practical experience in a setting appropriate to the student’s professional goals. Prerequisite: Upper-level standing and consent of department chair. Students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and review the required process. May be repeated for additional credit.

HHP 399 Senior Seminar in Human Performance (1) 
A capstone class that allows students to integrate knowledge, experience and research in the exploration of professional issues and trends in human performance. Prerequisite: senior standing.

HHP 401 Health Aspects of Aging (3)
See Gero 401

HHP 410 Essentials of Strength Training and Conditioning (3) 
This course is designed to give an overview of the practice of strength and conditioning coaches and personal trainers. The course will cover scientific and practical foundations of strength and conditioning, with an emphasis on program design using a variety of methods for various populations and exercise techniques. Other emphases will be student–driven. “Hands on” experience will be incorporated into lecture and lab. This course is designed to prepare students for the nationally recognized strength and conditioning and fitness certification examinations. Prerequisite: HHP 166, HHP 385, and senior standing.

HHP 462 Sport Ethics (3) 
This course is designed to create awareness of important ethical issues in sport and to provide students with skills and information to competently respond to them as they might occur in a professional environment. Real-life issues from a variety of perspectives (player, coach, administrator, parent, etc.) will be explored. Prerequisite: HHP 291 and upper-level standing.

HHP 463 Psychology of Coaching (3) 
A study of the psychological aspects of improving athletic performance of individuals and groups. The interrelatedness of sport and society also will be investigated. Prerequisite: Psy 101, and upper-level standing.

HHP 464 Social Issues in Recreation and Sport (3) 
This course aims to provide an overview of the field of sport sociology. It will focus on the relationships between sport and various institutions including education, family, politics, religion and the economy. Prerequisite: Upper-level standing.

HHP 465 Human Diseases (3) 
Discussion of disease process and ill–health. Emphasis on epidemiology, prevention, treatment, and the understanding of the etiology of communicable and non–communicable diseases. Prerequisite: Bio 243 or 343 or 344, and upper-level standing. Same as Bio 465.

HHP 467 Recreation Program Design (3)
This course is designed to provide the skills and knowledge necessary to provide leadership in the designing, implementation and evaluation of community and privately-based recreation programs. Prerequisites: HHP 367 and upper-level standing.

HHP 471 Adapted Physical Activity (3) 
The course focuses on the theories, principles, and practices of working with students with special needs in physical education programs. Prerequisite: Upper-level standing or instructor permission. 10 hours of field experience required.

HHP 480 Health and Human Sexuality (3) 
The study of human sexuality from a holistic health perspective. Emphasis will be placed on the biological, emotional, sociological, and behavioral factors concerning human sexuality. Prerequisites: HHP 181 and upper-level standing.

HHP 481 School Health Program (3) 
A survey of the coordinated school health program including policies, procedures, and activities related to the eight components of coordinated school health. Prerequisite: HHP 181 and upper-level standing.

HHP 482 Applied Epidemiology and Health Data Analysis (3) 
The study and application of epidemiology and health data analysis in the public health setting. Data analysis and biostatistics skills, tools, and techniques are employed. Prerequisites: HHP 181 and upper-level standing.

HHP 484 Community Health (3) 
A survey of community health education and promotion including an examination of the nature, extent and contributing factors of major community health issues and problems. The purpose, function, organization and administration of health services at the local, state and federal levels also will be examined. Prerequisites: HHP 181 and upper-level standing.  

HHP 486 Critical Issues in Health (2) 
Social, medical, and/or legal aspects of current critical issues in health. Prerequisite: HHP 181 and upper-level standing.

HHP 488 Health Promotion Programming (3) 
This course is designed to provide an overview of the skills and knowledge necessary to provide leadership in the designing, implementation and evaluation of public, community and worksite health promotion programs. Prerequisites: HHP 181 and upper-level standing.

HHP 489 Global Health (2); 1 additional hour optional for study abroad experience 
This course provides an introduction to important global health issues, including health determinants and key areas of disease burden currently affecting the developing world and the role that new health technologies can play in solving these problems.

HHP 491 Management of Physical Education and Sports (3) 
Acquaint students with the responsibilities and knowledge required in administrating physical education and sports programs. Prerequisite: upper-level standing.

HHP 494 Measurement and Evaluation in Human Performance (3) 
Study of techniques used in measurement and evaluation by health and physical educators. Included will be test constructions, survey of available materials, and practical experiences in test administrations and computer applications. Prerequisite: college level math class and upper-level standing.

HHP 495 Legal Aspects of Exercise and Sport (3) 
Legal concepts and principles related to the administration, teaching and coaching of exercise and sport. Issues regarding personnel, facilities, equipment, transportation, medical aspects, liability and gender will be examined. Prerequisite: Upperlevel standing or consent of instructor.

HHP 496 Recreation and Sport Facility Management (3)
Management and design principles applied to recreation and sport areas and facilities. Emphasis on operation efficiency, scheduling, quality service, fiscal responsibility and maintenance management and planning. Additional emphasis on physical accessibility of facilities. Prerequisite: Upper-level standing.

HEBREW

Heb 101 Biblical Hebrew I (4) 
An introduction to Biblical Hebrew grammar, vocabulary and syntax, coordinated with some translating activity in the Hebrew Bible. Five hours per week.

Heb 201 Biblical Hebrew II (4) 
An intensive review of Biblical Hebrew vocabulary, morphology and grammar, coordinated with extensive readings in the Former Prophets (Joshua–Kings) and selected poetry. Five hours per week. Prerequisite: Heb 101.

Heb 301 Biblical Hebrew III (3) 
Further study of Biblical Hebrew vocabulary and syntax, coordinated with extensive reading in the narratives of Genesis. Prerequisite: Heb 201.

Heb 405 Syriac (3) 
An introduction to Syriac grammar, vocabulary, and syntax, coordinated with translating activity in the Peshitta and the Syriac fathers, including text critical studies of the Greek New Testament and the Hebrew Bible. Prerequisite: Heb 301.

Heb 410 Latter Prophets (3) 
Extensive readings in the Latter Prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel and The Twelve), with emphasis on a close examination of grammatical and syntactical features. Prerequisite: Heb 301 or permission of instructor.

Heb 420 Exodus and Deuteronomy (3) 
Extensive readings in the narratives and legal and parenetic materials in Exodus and Deuteronomy, with emphasis on a close examination of grammatical and syntactical features. Prerequisite: Heb 201.

Heb 430 Psalms and Wisdom Literature (3) 
Extensive readings in the Psalms and Biblical wisdom literature (Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes), with emphasis on distinctive features of Hebrew poetry and the literature of the wisdom movement. Prerequisite: Heb 301 or permission of instructor.

Heb 440 Textual Criticism and Intertestamental Relationships (3) 
See Grk 430.

HISTORY

Hist 115 United States History (3)

This course examines the history of the United States from the American Revolution to the present by focusing on the significant people, trends, and events that have shaped the nation.  The course is also designed to develop students' analytical reading and writing skills, as well as hone their ability to think historically.   

Hist 131 World Civilization I (3)
Assesses the development of the basic political, philosophical, and cultural patterns of the ancient, near eastern, Asian, Greco–Roman, medieval and early modern European societies.

Hist 132 World Civilization II (3)
Special emphasis on major political, philosophical, cultural and economic trends in the modern world (since c. 1700) and the emergence of the world community. (May be taken independently of Hist 131.)

Hist 301 Women in American History (3)
This course takes a multicultural and interdisciplinary look at the lives, experiences, and roles of women in North American history from the founding to the present day. In addition to class lectures, students will read a variety of fiction and non-fiction sources as well as artistic and cultural representation by and depicting women.

Hist 304 Modern Middle East History (3)
This course examines broadly the social and political changes in the Middle East from 1800 to the present. It will focus particularly on the Ottoman Empire, European colonialism, the development of Arab nationalism, Islamic purity and reform movements, the rise of modern Israel and the Palestinian authority, and the late twentieth century development of nation-states in the Middle East. Prerequisites: Hist 131, 132.

Hist 306 Colonial and Revolutionary American (3)
European background and its relationship to the exploration, settlement, and development of the American colonies, with particular emphasis on English North America; economic, social, political, and cultural aspects of colonial life; the causes, course, and consequences of the American Revolution.

Hist 307 The Early American Nation: 1789–1865 (3)
The forces and institutions which shaped the development of the U.S. from 1789 to 1865: political parties and issues; economic change; religion, thought and reform; race and slavery; women and families in U.S. society, foreign relations, expansionism; the causes and course of the Civil War.

Hist 308 Gilded Age Progressive Area (3)
National reconstruction after the Civil War with emphasis on the place of Black Americans; industrialization and reform; the American position in world affairs through World War I.

Hist 309 Isolation to WW II (3)
Reviews the social and economic conditions of the United States between the world wars and in the post World War II period. Surveys the extent and degree of American involvement in world affairs. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and Hist 115 or instructor permission.

Hist 311 American Foreign Relations (3)
An analysis of U.S. foreign policy from the early national era to the present, with emphasis on the 20th century and Cold War years. Focuses on major theme — the impact of idealism, territorial and commercial expansion, American exceptionalism. Variant interpretations of U.S. diplomacy are studied critically. Same as PS 311.

Hist 313 Religion and Society in the United States (3)
A historical analysis of the interaction between religion and society in the United States from pre-colonial to contemporary times; emphasis on themes such as Puritanism, revivalism, social reform, religious pluralism, civil religion, and on-going theological issues. Attention is given to the development of Lutheranism in the American setting.

Hist 314 History of the American Presidency (3)
This course examines the history of the office of the President of the United States spanning its creation in the United States Constitution to the present.  It will explore the individual styles and legacies of the  individuals who have held this office over the course of the nation’s history. 

Hist 334 Early and Medieval Christianity (3)
This course surveys the early and medieval history of Christianity and the Church. Attention is given to the development of theological thought, ecclesiastical structures, and the various relationships between the Church and the “world” during this period of time.

Hist 335 The Renaissance and the Reformation (3)
The beginning period of the modern world. The three main divisions: Renaissance, the Reformation, and the Catholic Reformation. Prerequisite: Upper-level standing.

Hist 339 Europe since 1914 (3)
European thought and institutions in the twentieth century. The impact of total war and totalitarianism on contemporary Europe and the world; the development of a mass society; attempts at international organization; and the relative decline of European influence in the world. Prerequisite: Hist 132, or the permission of instructor.

Hist 341 Modern England (3)
A survey from the accession of the Tudors to the present day. Institutional developments and political theory, technological innovation and social change, and the impact of Britain in European, American and world affairs.

Hist 381 Baseball in American History (3)
This course will examine the relationships between our National Pastime and those forces that have significantly affected American society. (Summer Term)

Hist 410 U.S. History Since 1945 (3)
A study of the social, economic, political, legal, cultural, and foreign policy issues before the American people since 1960.

Hist 411 History and Literature of Aging (3)
See Gero 411.

Hist 417 African–American History (3)
Surveys the positions and conditions of Afro–Americans in various aspects of life in the United States. The problems and progress of blacks forced from Africa to present situations are included. Same as Soc 417.

Hist 420 Immigration and Ethnicity in American History (3)
This course surveys immigration into North America from colonial times to the present. Special attention is given to analyzing the various groups who came, determining push/pull factors, and realizing how these groups made their way in the new homeland. Focus will also include establishing the foundation for nativism and issues related to immigration restrictions throughout American history. Prerequisites: Sophomore or higher standing.

Hist 421 Latin America (3)
Emphasis is placed on major forces and institutions shaping Latin America: Pre-Columbian cultures, Iberian heritage, economic development and dependence, social and political change after independence, relations with the U.S., study of selected nations.

Hist 434 Medieval Crusades (3)
This course examines the Crusades during the period in medieval Europe from the late eleventh century through the late thirteenth century. It also analyzes the influence of the Crusades on medieval European society and religion through a close reading of primary and secondary sources. Prerequisite: Upper-level standing.

Hist 451 Russia, the Soviet Union, and After (3)
A survey of Russian and Soviet history from early beginnings with special emphasis on political, social, economic, religious and cultural developments of modern Russia and the Soviet Union.

Hist 455 East Asian Civilizations (3)
Survey of traditional and contemporary social, political, and intellectual patterns of China and Japan. Asia and the West, the challenge of modernization, and the overturning of traditional social order in the twentieth century.

Hist 487 United States Constitutional History (3)
This course explores the history of the United States Constitution through an examination of its creation in Philadelphia in 1787, subsequent amendments to the Constitution over the last two hundred years and the constitutional crises that have periodically confronted the country. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing and Hist 115 or instructor permission.

Hist 490 Capstone Seminar (3)
The capstone seminar provides students with the opportunity to integrate and apply learning from their entire college experience. Students will develop and complete a project in conjunction with the course instructor or other approved mentor. Approved projects will require students to use skills, methodology and knowledge to address important issues, explore key arguments, and critique common practices germane to their academic discipline. Internships and fieldwork experiences may also be acceptable projects. The course will also prepare students for the transition from college to graduate/professional school. Prerequisite: Senior standing.  

Hist 491 Senior Seminar in History
Students will craft a substantial research paper in history based on original sources, the topic of which is determined in consultation with the professor.  Students will also be exposed to basic historical theory and trends in historiography.  This course counts as the capstone for the history major.  

Hist 499 Honors Course (1) or (2)
Arranged for qualified Seniors.

LATIN

LAT 101 Latin I (3)
An introduction to the grammar, vocabulary and syntax of Latin. Select sentences will be read.

LAT 102 Latin II (3)
A continuation of Latin I. Select sentences and simple passages of prose will be read. Pre-requisite: LAT 101 or equivalent

MATHEMATICS

Junior standing or higher is recommended for 300 or 400 level college courses in mathematics.

Math 122 Introduction to Statistics (3)
The fundamentals of elementary statistics, data collection and analysis, probability, distributions, sampling, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression.

Math 132 Intermediate Algebra (3)
An overview of fundamental algebraic concepts. Real and complex numbers, algebraic expressions, equations and inequalities, functions, polynomials, rational expressions, graphing, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations and matrices. Prerequisite: one year of high school algebra.

Math 142 Survey of Contemporary Mathematics (3)
Selected topics which may include graph theory, apportionment, fair division, voting methods, bin packing, cryptography and coding, probability and statistics, game theory, financial mathematics, non-Euclidean geometry, dynamics of growth, tessellations and symmetry. Open to students with fewer than three years of high school mathematics or those with departmental permission.

Math 151 Pre-Calculus Mathematics (3)
A study of elementary functions, their graphs and application, including polynomials, rational algebraic functions, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions.

Math 175 Finite Mathematics (3)
Introduction to finite mathematics through the study of logic, sets, probability, statistics, game theory, vectors, matrices, and linear programming. Many applications.

Math 182 Calculus with Applications (3)
An overview of calculus. Topics include limits, continuity, differentiation, exponential growth and decay, integration and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Applications to business, life sciences and social sciences will be emphasized. Prerequisite: four years of high school mathematics or equivalent.

Math 184 Calculus I (4)
A beginning course in the analysis of functions including analytic geometry. A study of limits, techniques and applications of differentiation, basic integration and transcendental functions. Prerequisite: four years of high school mathematics or equivalent.

Math 186 Calculus II (4)
A continuation of Calculus I. Topics studied include integration, analytical geometry and vectors in two-dimensional space, and techniques of integration. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Math 184 or instructor’s permission.

Math 201 Concepts of Mathematics I (3)
An activities approach to problem solving, systems of numeration, properties of whole numbers, integers, fractions, real numbers, and numerical operations, number theory and statistics. Only available to Early Childhood and Elementary Education students. Prerequisite: Sophomore level or higher.

Math 219 Introduction to Symbolic Logic (3)
An introduction to mathematical logic including history and development, sentential and predicate logic (including equivalence, implication, deduction, completeness, compactness, and soundness) cardinality, computability, and incompleteness. Same as Phil 319.

Math 252 Mathematical Structures (3)
A transition course which introduces students to logic, set theory, and the axiomatic method. This course is designed for students continuing to higher level mathematics courses. Prerequisite: Sophomore level or higher, or instructor’s permission.

Math 284 Calculus III (4)
A continuation of Calculus II. A study of analytic geometry in three dimensional space, partial differentiation, multiple integration and infinite series. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Math 186.

Math 301 Concepts of Mathematics II (3)
An activities approach to studying mathematics concepts in probability, functions and algebra, and numerous topics in geometry. Geometrical topics include two and three-dimensional geometry, constructions, congruences, motion and coordinate geometry symmetries and concepts of measurement. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Math 201 or one semester of calculus.

Math 305 Mathematics for Elementary/Middle Level Teachers (3)
An activity approach to teaching and learning mathematics concepts in geometry, probability, statistics, logic, and calculators. Special attention is devoted to various grade levels on which various topics are presented and how they can be presented. Prerequisite: three hours of college level mathematics and junior level standing, or permission of the arts and sciences division or education division.

Math 315 History of Mathematics (1)
The development of mathematics throughout various civilizations. It is designed to create an appreciation for our present mathematical system and an understanding of how our present mathematical system came to be what it is today. Prerequisite: Math 252 and three semesters of college mathematics.

Math 318 Seminar in Mathematics (1–3)
Math topics of interest, readings and problems in mathematics. Prerequisite: 15 hours of college mathematics or permission of instructor.

Math 321 Numerical Analysis (3)
An introduction to the basic algorithms of numerical analysis. Topics include floating point arithmetic, interpolation and approximation, numerical integration, systems of linear equations, solution of non-linear equations, and solution of ordinary differential equations. Assignments using Mathematica will give experience in applying selected algorithms. Prerequisite: CS 131 and 141, and Math 384 are strongly recommended. Same as CS 321.

Math 322 Foundations of Statistics (3)
A study of mathematical statistics including probability distributions sampling theory, point estimation, methods of correlation and regression, and the principles of statistical inference. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Math 284 or concurrent registration.

Math 323 Foundations of Statistics II (3)
A study of mathematical statistics including sampling theory, point estimation, game and decision theory, hypothesis testing, experimental design, methods of correlation and regression, ANOVA, and non-parametric tests. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Math 322.

Math 332 Abstract Algebra I (3)
An introduction to algebraic structures with an emphasis on groups, subgroups, and group isomorphisms. A brief introduction to rings, domains and fields. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Math 252 and upper-level standing.

Math 333 Linear Algebra (3)
Linear algebraic structures, their theory and application. Matrices, determinants, linear transformations, programming, vectors and vector spaces, dependence, inner products, row operations and echelon systems. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Math 284; Math 252 is recommended.

Math 335 Number Theory (3)
Mathematical induction, greatest common divisor, fundamental theorem of arithmetic, prime and composite integers, and congruences. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Math 252 and three semesters of college mathematics.

Math 342 Abstract Algebra II (3)
A continuation of Math 332 with an emphasis on polynomials over integral domains and polynomials over field. Prerequisite:A grade of C or higher in Math 332 or equivalent.

Math 348 Discrete Mathematics (3)
See CS 348.

Math 365 Foundations of Geometry (3)
An introduction to the general study of geometries including projective, finite, and non-Euclidean geometries. Prerequisites: high school geometry, three semesters of college mathematics and a grade of C or higher in Math 252.

Math 382 Real Analysis I (3)
Properties of the real number system, sequences, limits, continuity, the derivative, Riemann integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and series. Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher in Math 252 and 284.

Math 383 Real Analysis II (3)
Selected topics from limits, continuity, properties of the derivative, the Riemann, integral and the fundamental theorem of the Calculus. A natural continuation of Real Analysis I. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Math 382.

Math 384 Differential Equations (3)
A study of ordinary differential equations, first and higher order, systems linear and non-linear, their solutions and applications, including La Place Transforms. Prerequisite: A grade of C or higher in Math 284.

Math 402 Practical Math Labs and Activities for Elementary Teachers (3)
This course is designed to give the elementary teacher practice in analyzing math materials for math activities and in writing and building these activities for the classroom. Emphasis will be on topics in geometry as: relationships in the triangle, on parallel lines, and in the circle; other elementary math topics will be investigated. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

Math 475 Mathematical Modeling (3)
This course is an introduction to mathematical modeling of deterministic and stochastic dynamical systems. Differential equations, matrices, elementary probability and statistics will be applied to the development and analysis of continuous and discrete models that arise in the physical, biological, social and management sciences. Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher in Math 322, 333, and 384.

MUSIC

Mu 101 Elements of Music in the Digital Age (3)
Basic concepts of rhythm, melody, harmony and musical design are developed through listening, singing, playing, and creative activities. Discussion of various kinds of music from Bach to rock.

Mu 102 Aural Skills I (2)
An in-depth study of the fundamentals of music theory with emphasis on the development of aural performance and perception. Content includes melodic, harmonic, and rhythmic dictation, sight singing, and contextual listening and identification. Students whose program requires music theory take Mu 102 concurrently with Mu 103. A grade of C or higher in this course is required in order to register for Mu 104.

Mu 103 Music Theory I (3)
The procedures of writing and analyzing music in the common practice idiom. Topics include notation practices (manuscript and using computer), triads and seventh chords, figured bass, lead sheet notation, setting texts to music, transposition, voice leading, part writing using triads, and cadences. A grade of C or higher in this course is required in order to register for Mu 105.

Mu 104 Aural Skills II (2)
A continuation of Mu 102. Topics include harmonic hearing, other scales, simple song forms. More advanced involvement in sightsinging, melodic dictation and creativity. Students whose program requires this course normally take it concurrently with Mu 105. Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in Mu 102. A grade of C or higher in this course is required in order to register for Mu 202.

Mu 105 Music Theory II (3)
A continuation of Mu 103. Topics include non-chord tones, part writing and harmonization using seventh chords and secondary chords, modulations, and large-scale formal structures. Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in Mu 103. A grade of C or higher in this course is required in order to register for Mu 203.

Mu 111 Music Appreciation (3)
This course is a music appreciation course designed for the non-music major. It will cover the basic elements of music as well as the trends throughout music history.

Mu 115 History of Rock (3)
A survey of the early history of rock music, including its antecedents in rhythm and blues and country. The course consists of two areas of study: (1) analysis of musical characteristics and evolving styles, and (2) a consideration of the sociopolitical impact rock music has had on the second half of the twentieth century, with emphasis on the role of rock as an important voice of the counterculture. Rock’s interconnection with other arts such as film and poetry will also be discussed. The ability to read music is not required.

Mu 161 Introduction to Music Therapy (3)
This course will introduce the profession of music therapy. Students will explore research literature, analyze public awareness of music therapy, observe and measure the effectiveness of music therapy techniques, and develop a working definition of music therapy. Course assignments and field experiences will reinforce course content.

Mu 202 Aural Skills III (2)
A continuation of Mu 104. Topics include local chromaticism, melodic and harmonic modulations to closely related keys, and identification of these elements aurally within the context of larger excerpts. Methods include sightsinging, melodic dictation, harmonic dictation, error detection and analytical listening. Meets two hours per week, with individual audits with the instructor every two weeks. Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in Mu 104. A grade of C or higher in this course is required in order to register for Mu 204.

Mu 203 Music Theory III (3)
A continuation of Mu 105. Topics include chromatic harmonies, borrowed chords, Neapolitan chords, augmented sixth chords, and extended and altered harmonies. Analysis and composition based on techniques of the 19th and early 20th centuries. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in Mu 105. A grade of C or higher in this course is required in order to register for Mu 205. 

Mu 204 Aural Skills IV (2)
A continuation of Mu 202. Topics those from prior semesters, plus modal and atonal melodies. Methods include sightsinging, melodic dictation, harmonic dictation, error detection and analytical listening. Meets two hours per week, with individual audits with the instructor every two weeks. Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in Mu 202.

Mu 205 Music Theory IV (3)
A continuation of Mu 203. Topics include analysis of and composition in the basic polyphonic techniques and procedures as found in the motet, invention, and fugue; analysis of significant larger forms of homophonic compositions as exemplified in theme and variations, rondo, and sonata–allegro; and analysis of and composition in the techniques and procedures of contemporary and electronic music. Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in Mu 203. 

Mu 211 Music History to 1750 (3)
A survey of music literature and history from ancient times to about 1750. Prerequisite: Mu 105.

Mu 212 Music History since 1750 (3)
A survey of music literature and history from about 1750 to the present day. Prerequisite: Mu 105.

Mu 213 World Music (3)
A study of the unique musical styles and traditions associated with diverse world cultures, including Latin America, the Middle East, Asia and Africa. Emphasis will be placed on the study of music in its cultural, social and historical contexts. Prerequisite: Mu 105 or instructor permission.

Mu 214 Jazz: An American Experience (3)
An exploration of the fundamentals of jazz. Topics include jazz styles, eras, and musical forms; the experiences of American cultural identity and how this heritage shaped the development of jazz.

Mu 303 Arranging (2)
Problems of scoring for instruments, such as range, tone qualities, balance, and blend. Particular emphasis on arranging music suitable for school ensembles. Prerequisite: Mu 105.

Mu 320 Seminar in Music (3)
An in-depth study of a topic selected by the instructor. May be repeated for credit when the topic differs. Prerequisite: Mu 211 or 212 (whichever is relevant), or permission of instructor.

Mu 331 Basic Conducting (2)
Techniques of conducting and rehearsal procedures are emphasized through a study of literature suitable for school or church.

Mu 332 Instrumental Conducting (2)
The study of specific conducting techniques required for instrumental ensembles. Prerequisite: Mu 331.

Mu 333 Choral Conducting (2)
The study of specific conducting techniques required for leading choral rehearsals and performances. Prerequisite: Mu 331.

Mu 334 Choral Literature and Development (2)
An examination of selected sacred and secular choral music from the Renaissance to the present. Emphasis is placed on choral literature suitable for performance and programs at the elementary and secondary levels and/or choral music for the liturgical service and church year.

Mu 354 Diction (2)
The goal of this course is to incorporate the fundamental working knowledge of the International Phonetic Alphabet as it is used in vocal diction and pedagogy. Languages covered include English, Italian, German and French.

Mu 399 Independent Study (1–3)
Hours and topics by arrangement with instructor. Used to pursue special interests in music.

Mu 493 Senior Project (1-2)
The capstone experience in the undergraduate study of music. Normally consists of a public recital with a supporting written document. Enrollment limited to music majors. Students in education programs register for 1 hour; all others register for 2 hours.

MUSIC: APPLIED

The principal objectives of applied instruction are the development of performing competencies and the ability to read, understand, and bring to performance musical compositions.

Below are the various areas in which applied instruction is available. The first digit of each course number represents the level of instruction: “1” for beginning, “2” for advanced beginning, “3” for intermediate, and “4” for advanced. Students with no prior experience on an instrument or voice should register for the 100-level of the appropriate course. Others register for the level determined by their current instructor. Students with prior experience, but not at Concordia, should register for the 200-level; instructors will move them to a higher level after the semester begins if it seems appropriate. Course fees are charged for applied instruction in addition to tuition (except for MuAp 151, 161, and 171, which are all group lessons).

MuAp x11 Trumpet I
MuAp x12 Horn
MuAp x13 Trombone
MuAp x14 Euphonium
MuAp x15 Tuba
MuAp x21 Flute
MuAp x22 Oboe
MuAp x23 Bassoon
MuAp x24 Clarinet
MuAp x25 Saxophone
MuAp x31 Violin
MuAp x32 Viola
MuAp x33 Cello
MuAp x34 Double Bass
MuAp x41 Percussion
MuAp x51 Voice
MuAp x61 Guitar
MuAp x62 Bass Guitar
MuAp x71 Piano
MuAp x73 Harpsichord
MuAp x81 Organ
MuAp 291, 391, 491 Composition (prerequisite: Mu 105)

The following Applied Music courses are also offered:
MuAp 182 Service Playing 
MuAp 272 Keyboard Skills
MuAp 375 Jazz/Rock Piano (Intermediate)
(prerequisite: MuAp 271)
MuAp 383 Organ Improvisation 
MuAp 384 Organ Accompanying
MuAp 475 Jazz/Rock Piano (Advanced)
(prerequisite: MuAp 271) 

Applied music lessons are available for one credit; music majors, and advanced students with permission of the instructor, may register for one or two credits. An exception is MuAp 171 Beginning Piano, which is taken for two credits and is available to all students regardless of major. Applied music courses may not be audited.

MUSIC: CHURCH MUSIC

ChMu 174 Songwriting for Contemporary Worship (2)
An introduction to songwriting techniques used for composing songs in jazz influenced styles for contemporary worship.

ChMu 213 Literature of the Organ (1)
A study of the music of the organ from the Renaissance to the present and its relationship to general music history. Special consideration of music used in the Lutheran service.

ChMu 231 Contemporary Church Music Administration (1)
A course designed to study leadership skills needed to create and administrate a worship arts program utilizing a variety of messengers. 

ChMu 275 Hymn Adaptations (2)
An introduction to hymn adaptations using techniques influenced by jazz, such as bossa nova, rhythm and blues, and rock and jazz-influenced ballads. Prerequisite: Mu 105 with a grade of C or higher.

ChMu 282 Media in Contemporary Worship (2)
An introduction to various recording, live sound, and visual media techniques used in a variety of worship and community outreach environments.

ChMu 313 Christian Hymnody (2)
A historical study of the hymns of western Christianity. Although those used by Lutherans will be a particular focus, the course includes hymns from all traditions. Prior experience in music is helpful, but not required.

ChMu 315 Organ Registration (1)
A study of the physical principles governing organ design and registration. A practical application of these historic concepts to literature played on instruments commonly found in churches.

ChMu 411 Christian Liturgy (2)
A history of Christian liturgy, with particular attention paid to Lutheran use. Includes a discussion of theological, textual, musical and cultural issues. Prior experience in music is not required.

ChMu 431 Liturgical Church Music Administration (2)
The administration of a comprehensive church music program, with consideration of professional and ethical issues for church musicians. Primarily for students with a major in church music. Prerequisite or co-requisite: ChMu 313 and 411, or permission of instructor.

MUSIC: ENSEMBLES

In order to meet varying interests, the music department offers a wide choice of instrumental, choral, and mixed ensembles. The essential purposes of each ensemble are artistic performance and the development of musicianship. Ensembles are open to all students, although some require auditions. Grading for ensembles is pass/fail, and all may be taken for credit or audited (although certain programs require them to be taken for credit-check program requirements).

Mu 232 Male Chorus (1)
Easy to moderately difficult choral literature in male voice arrangements. Participation includes performances in chapel, church services, at Christmas at Concordia, and for the Spring Concert. Some music may be performed together with the Women’s Chorale. Rehearses 3 hours per week. No audition is required.

Mu 233 Women’s Chorale (1)
Easy to moderately difficult choral literature in female voice arrangements. Participation includes performances in chapel, church services, at Christmas at Concordia, and for the Spring Concert. Some music may be performed together with the Male Chorus. Rehearses 3 hours per week. No audition is required.

Mu 236 University A Cappella Choir (1)
The University A Cappella Choir is the concert choir of the university and the premier choral ensemble. Repertoire for the 65- voice select mixed choir is chosen from the entire spectrum of choral music, including new works by local and regional composers as well as music from a variety of cultures. The choir maintains a rigorous rehearsal and travel schedule, touring nationally and internationally. Rehearses 5 hours per week. Membership is by audition.

Mu 237 University Chamber Choir (1)
The University Chamber Choir is a 16–voice select choir that sings a diverse repertoire of chamber choral music. The group travels regionally and nationally. Members are chosen from the University A Cappella Choir. Rehearses as needed.

Mu 241 University Symphonic Band (1)
The University Symphonic Band is the university’s premier instrumental ensemble. Repertoire for the ensemble is chosen from the entire spectrum of wind ensemble and concert band literature and includes everything from traditional literature to new commissions to music of other cultures. The ensemble keeps an active rehearsal schedule and travels both regionally and nationally. Rehearses 3 days per week for a total of 5 hours. Membership is by audition.

Mu 242 University Concert Band (1)  
The University Concert Band performs a diverse array of sacred and traditional concert band repertoire. Membership is open to all Concordia students and members of the community. The group rehearses two hours per week and typically has two concert performances each semester.  The University Concert Band is an open enrollment ensemble with auditions conducted for placement within each section. 

Mu 243 Bulldog Band (1)
A highly spirited ensemble that supports and enriches the Concordia community through regular performances at football and basketball games. Rehearses one hour per week. No audition is required.

Mu 244 Brass Ensemble (1)
A chamber ensemble that performs music appropriate for the brass idiom. A broad range of literature is explored from the Renaissance to the 21st century. Rehearses 2 days per week for a total of 3 hours; performs frequently for chapel and off-campus events. Membership is by audition.

Mu 245 Small Ensemble (1)
Study of ensemble literature for homogeneous groups of strings, winds, or percussion; or mixed ensembles including keyboard instruments and/or voice. Most groups rehearse 1 hour per week. Membership is open to all with the prior permission of the instructor.

Mu 246 Jazz Ensemble (1)
The Jazz Ensemble performs music from the big band era to the latest jazz fusion charts. Appears for campus events, school assemblies, and off–campus concerts. Rehearses 2 hours per week. Membership is by audition.

Mu 247 Handbell Choir (1)
The handbell choirs prepare works from standard handbell literature for use in concerts and worship services on and off campus. The beginning choir rehearses 1 hour per week; the advanced choir rehearses 2 hours per week. Membership is by audition.

Mu 248 Chamber Orchestra (1)
The Concordia University Chamber Orchestra studies and performs literature for a small orchestra of strings and winds.

Mu 252 University Praise Band (1)
The University Praise Band studies and performs many of the top 20 CCLI Christian songs and hymn adaptations within a variety of jazz-influenced styles such as rock, R&B, samba, blues, funk, fusion, and reggae for chapel and special gatherings on campus. Rehearses 2 hours per week. Membership is by audition. P/F.

MUSIC: SCHOOL MUSIC

ScMu 262 Techniques in Woodwinds (2)
Playing techniques of woodwind instruments, including flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon and saxophone. Topics include correct tone production, knowledge of fingerings on all woodwind instruments, and the care of instruments. Students will acquire sufficient facility on each instrument to be able to demonstrate various teaching techniques.

ScMu 263 Techniques in Brass (2)
Playing techniques of the trumpet, horn, trombone, baritone and tuba. Topics include tone production, posture, breathing, and articulation. Students will acquire sufficient facility in each instrument to be able to demonstrate various teaching techniques.

ScMu 264 Techniques in Percussion (2)
Percussion techniques are developed with emphasis on the snare drum. Timpani, mallet instruments, Latin American instruments, and cymbal techniques are also covered. Students will acquire sufficient facility in each instrument to be able to demonstrate various teaching techniques.

ScMu 265 Techniques in Strings (2)
Elementary instruction in violin, viola, cello and bass, including tuning, bowing, fingering, knowledge of positions and care of instruments. Students will acquire sufficient facility in each instrument to be able to demonstrate various teaching techniques.

ScMu 317 Instrumental Literature and Development (2)
A study of available instrumental solo and ensemble literature suitable for programs at the elementary and secondary levels. Special consideration is given to concerted music useful for worship services.

ScMu 328 Methods of Elementary Music (3)
The place and importance of classroom music. Techniques of teaching the elements of music; materials, creativity, classroom instruments, singing.

ScMu 361 Marching Band Techniques (1)
An introduction to music arranging and drill writing for the marching band. Covers methodologies and pedagogy of marching maneuvers and drill rehearsing, music selections, and show design.

ScMu 431 Organization and Administration of Elementary and Secondary Music (2)
A study of the organizational structure of the total K–12 music program, with special emphasis on developing a philosophy of music education, curriculum, administration, supervision, and development of classroom and special music programs and organizations.

NURSING

Nur 400 Pathophysiology (3)

Prepares students with a foundation for understanding major pathophysiology, applied Pharmacology methods, and related nursing implications to pathologic human development.

Nur 410 Professional Roles, Issues, and Nursing Theories (3)

Focus is upon the bridge to baccalaureate education, the socialization process, and professional transition in nursing roles. This course examines current local, national, and international healthcare and nursing issues, including the discussion of theory development and application as currently evolving issues in healthcare and nursing. Implications on integrating a personal philosophy of nursing that serves as a holistic and culturally-sensitive framework are emphasized.

Nur 415 Introduction to Nursing Research and Evidence-Based Practice (3)

Examines the basic overview of the research process, clinical judgment, and current evidence-based practice utilized in nursing. Emphasis is on the review, critique, and application of published nursing research with consideration of the utilization of research findings in clinical practice. Ethical and legal considerations in nursing research are addressed.
Prerequisite: Statistics

Nur 420 Forensic Nursing (3)

Forensic Nursing combines aspects of psychology, sociology, medicine, law and forensic science. Forensic nurses work with the living, deceased, the accused and the condemned in criminal investigations, crimes, traumas, legal cases, and evidence-based patient treatment. Students will learns how to take their assessment skills to a higher level, utilize precise documentation and identify injuries due to violence and trauma, while complying with the Joint Commission's statement which addresses new standards for hospitals' response to abuse, trauma and violence.

Nur 426 Parish Nursing (3)

Designed to understand the Parish nurse's role in the health care, community, and congregational settings. Emphasis is placed on spiritual care, integration of faith and health, health education, professional counsel, volunteer training and advocacy.

Nur 427 Theories and Applications in Nursing Informatics (3)

Theory and application of health information technology. Includes training in the use of healthcare technology and an introduction to trends and future trends in health informatics.

Nur 430 Issues of Aging and Longevity (3)

Develops the student's knowledge of normal aging and nursing skills critical to the care of older adults. Includes issues related to the aging client in the community and the challenges of healthcare issues confronted by aging clients. Emphasis is on caring for the older adult and providing health promotion, disease prevention, illness care, restoration, rehabilitation, health counseling, education, spiritual care, and client advocate. Incorporate safe practicum experiences with effective decision making within community or healthcare setting.
Prerequisite: Lifespan Development or related course/demonstrated proficiency.

Nur 484 Health Assessment and Promotion for Community Nursing: Theory and Practice (5)

Students study the nature, extent, and causes of the basic community health problems to build an understanding of the purpose, function, organization and administration of community health services at local, state, and national levels. Includes clinical component.

Nur 485 Diverse and Vulnerable Population-Based Health (3)

Serves to explore epidemiology with underserved and vulnerable populations applied to preserving, promoting, and maintaining the health of the global and diverse population and grounded in social justice.

Nur 486 Nursing Management and Servant Leadership (3)

Evaluates role of nurse manager in the healthcare setting, including management theory, concepts and integrating technology for efficient practice. Emphasis on the impact of power, politics, policy, and regulatory guidelines on the role of leadership, effective communication, and ethical decision making skills within the organizational structure.

Nur 499 Practicum (4)

The practicum requires students to conduct programmatic research and implement a project in their area of professional interest. Students must interview with and gain permission from the program director before enrolling.

ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT 
(For Degree Completion Program Students Only)

ORGM 301 Group and Organizational Behavior (3)
A study of group formation, development and performance as it affects organizational effectiveness. Emphasis includes exposure to decision making and resolving conflicts in groups. Students develop strategies for efficient, productive group management and determine which tasks are best handled by groups as opposed to individuals. Students are also exposed to intergroup dynamics and management strategies.

ORGM 302 Human Relations and Workplace Diversity (2)
Addresses human relations as they relate to workplace diversity. Issues stemming from differences in social characteristics such as age, gender, race, ethnicity, national origin, ableness, and sexual orientation will be addressed.

ORGM 303 Management Concepts (3)
Students examine the formal and informal functions of organizations and analyze an agency or organization based on a systems model. Students will be introduced to the concept of world view and encouraged to explore how their beliefs and understandings influence their personal world views. Students will also analyze and solve organizational problems using multiple techniques. This analysis will be applied to students’ work-related study projects.

ORGM 304 Methods of Research and Analysis (3)
An introduction to research and its tools with specific emphasis upon helping the student complete business research and understand managerial decision-making. Content will include statistical methods, database development, research methods, and analysis of a problem or opportunity suitable for the business research module.

ORGM 305 Senior Thesis, Part I (2)
This is a major research effort with the purposes of 1) enhancing knowledge in an area related to one’s work or community, 2) improving writing skills, 3) improving public presentation skills, and 4) providing research skills that will assist in effective decision making. Students will identify research topics that reflect a business situation with current and future implications. The initial oral presentation on progress will be made in this module.

ORGM 407 Organizational Communication (3)
This course investigates the role of communication in creating a productive organizational environment. It aids students in developing or strengthening their communication skills by focusing on interpersonal, group, and presentation skills.

ORGM 408 Accounting for Managers (3)
An overview of the acquisition, analysis, and reporting of financial information, including a study of income statements, balance sheets, cash flow, budgets, changes in financial position, and ratio analysis. Emphasis is on reading and understanding accounting documents rather than preparation.

ORGM 409 Human Resource Administration (3)
Students explore the values and perceptions of selected groups affecting social and economic life through an analysis of policies and practices of recruitment, selection, training, development, and compensation of employees. Special attention is given to Equal Opportunity and Office of Safety and Health Administration legislation through case studies and simulations. Principles of economics as they need to be understood and utilized by managers and supervisors in all fields. The internationalization of our economy and possible actions affecting the economy of all organizations will be included.

ORGM 410 Managerial Economics (3)
Principles of economics as they need to be understood and utilized by managers and supervisors in all fields. The internationalization of our economy and possible actions affecting the economy of all organizations will be included.

ORGM 412 Marketing in a Global Economy (3)
Students will be exposed to basic marketing theory and terminology and then given the opportunity to apply this newly acquired knowledge to analyze real-world cases exploring domestic and international marketing opportunities and problems. This exploration is designed to provide students with the skills necessary to identify and evaluate critical marketing data and to develop workable programs to solve problems and capitalize on opportunities.

ORGM 413 Principles of Management and Supervision (4)
Students examine motivational theory and its applications to individual and group functioning in work and home situations. Leadership styles related to particular circumstances are analyzed. Power, politics, and the management of conflict are covered through readings and class practice, with an analysis of the effect on productivity and job satisfaction. Students will be introduced to management techniques which promote creativity and continuous improvement.

ORGM 414 Organizational Ethics (3)
TThis course surveys ethical issues confronting business in the context of the students’ personal world views. Students are asked to improve management accountability and respect for human rights, and to lead a responsible lifestyle in the contemporary world.

ORGM 415 Senior Thesis, Part II (2)
This is the culmination of more than a year’s research and writing on a topic of employer or community interest. The writing of the project is completed and the findings and conclusions are presented orally to the group.

PHILOSOPHY

Phil 301 Concepts in Philosophy (3)
A general orientation in the field of philosophy through a consideration of its major types and problems. Emphasis upon the practice of critical thinking and an appreciation of the greater thought systems of history.

Phil 311 History of Philosophical Thought I (3)
An introduction to western philosophy through the study of leading thinkers and their systems of thought. The course begins with the pre–Socratic period in Greece (5th century B.C.), moves through the beginning of the Christian era and culminates in the Medieval era to the 14th century.

Phil 312 History of Philosophical Thought II (3)
An introduction to Western philosophy beginning with the rise of the scientific method and the beginnings of modern empiricism, centering then on the watershed of Western philosophy, that is, Immanuel Kant, and his immediate successors, and concluding with the survey of 20th century thought and the age of analysis.

Phil 319 Introduction to Symbolic Logic (3)
See Math 219.

Phil 499 Honors Course (3)
The course is designed to offer some flexibility for the student wishing to accomplish a minor in philosophy. By agreement with the department the student can accomplish a semester focus on a particular philosopher or school of philosophy or issue in philosophy. The student can fulfill this course also by work in their major department on a topic or school of thought that investigates philosophical underpinnings and questions pertinent to their major discipline, e.g., philosophy of science, philosophy in literature, philosophical theology, etc. This option should be undertaken by mutual agreement of both the philosophy instructor(s) and the pertinent department instructor and their departments.

PHYSICS

Phys 109 Introductory Physics (3)
Lecture 2, Lab. 2. An introduction to the concepts of physics used to understand and explain the sensibleness of nature, particle and wave ideas, theories that explain everyday phenomena. Not open to students who have had a year of high school physics.

Phys 110 Principles of Physics (4)
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. A study of general physics through experiments, lectures and discussion. Science as a way of knowing — Scientific methodology and practice; mechanics of particles and of waves; momentum, energy and conservation laws; thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; light; relativity and quantum mechanics.

Phys 111 General Physics I (4)
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. Experiments, lectures and discussions to reveal the sensibleness of nature via mechanics of particles and waves as models, relativity and conservation laws, momentum and energy, and the nature of scientific inquiry. Prerequisite: a year of high physics or Phys 109, one year of high school algebra or equivalent and trigonometry (concurrent registration acceptable).

Phys 112 General Physics II (4)
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. Continuation of Phys 111 with special emphasis on electricity and magnetism, light, and relativity and their relation to conservation principles and current scientific explanation. Prerequisite: Phys 111 or equivalent.

Phys 211 General Physics I Calculus Topics (1)
Lecture 1. A calculus-based treatment of topics covered in Phys 111. Enrollment in Phys 211 and Phys 111 is equivalent to taking a calculus-based general physics course. Prerequisites: Phys 111 or concurrent registration. Math 184 or concurrent registration with instructor’s permission.

Phys 212 General Physics II Calculus Topics (1)  
Lecture 1. A calculus-based treatment of topics covered in Phys 112. Enrollment in Phys 212 and Phys 112 is equivalent to taking a calculus-based general physics course. Prerequisites: Phys 112 or concurrent registration. Math 186 or concurrent registration with instructor’s permission.

Phys 221 Statics (3)
The study of forces on bodies in equilibrium. Force systems, equilibrium, structures, trusses, frames and machines, distributed forces, beams, friction, centers of mass and moments of inertia. Prerequisites: Math 186, Phys 111 or equivalent.

Phys 321 Introductory Mechanics (3)
Lecture 3. Calculus treatment of the motion of particles and rigid bodies using Newtonian force methods: non-inertial reference frames, classical mechanics, relativistic laws of motion of a particle. Prerequisites: calculus and Phys 111 or permission of instructor, Phys 381 is recommended.

Phys 331 Descriptive Astronomy (3)
Lecture 3. See Sci 331.

Phys 351 Classroom Activities with Physical Science (3)
Lecture 1, Lab. 4. See Sci 351.

Phys 353 Thermodynamics (3)
See Chem 353.

Phys 354 Quantum Mechanics (3)
See Chem 354.

Phys 355 Physical Chemistry Laboratory (1)
Lab.3. Same as Chem 355.

Phys 356 Physical Chemistry Laboratory II (1)
Lab.3. Same as Chem 356.

Phys 371 Electronics (3)
Laboratory approach to the study of integrated circuits and transistors. Classroom component for supporting theory. Prerequisites: Calculus and General Physics II.

Phys 381 Modern Physics (3)
Lecture 3. Physics of the 20th century. Relativity, the wave–particle duality, atomic models, the quantum theory. Prerequisites: General Physics and Calculus.

Phys 382 Advanced Physics Lab. I, II, III (1)
Lab. 3. Selected experiments in modern physics requiring library research. Prerequisite: Phys 381 or concurrent registration. May be taken more than once.

Phys 383 Introduction to Nuclear and Particle Physics (3)
Study of nuclear radiations, nuclear structure and models, and the energetics of sub-atomic particle interactions. Prerequisite: Phys 112 and 381, Calculus or concurrent registration, or permission of instructor.

Phys 390 Electricity and Magnetism (3)
Study of electrical and magnetic phenomena and their understanding through models and formulation. Prerequisite: Phys 112 and Math 186 or equivalent, Phys 381 is recommended.

Phys 395 Advanced Topics in Physics Seminar (3)
Advanced study of the concepts and techniques of an area of physics important to the field and outside the content of other physics courses. Specific topics will be determined by the instructor and the students, and may include Quantum Mechanics, Thermodynamics, Optics, Astrophysics, or Atomic Physics. Prerequisites: Upper-level standing in physics or physical sciences, or approval of the instructor.

Phys 399 Research in Physics (2)
Capstone course in physics. Students perform supervised independent research in physics, and also learn about issues related to the profession. Prerequisites: Phys 381 and 382 and permission of the instructor.

Phys 498 Physics Internship (1-3)
Students gain experience in a physics related field by working in an internship position under the direct supervision of a physicist and/or an engineer. Students should consult the physics faculty and the director of career planning and placement and also pick up a copy of the guidelines and internship forms from the Office of Career Planning and Placement. Prerequisites: Phys 111, Phys 112, Phys 381, Phys 382, minimum junior standing and permission of the physics faculty.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

PS 111 American Government (3)
An analysis of the U.S. political system and its operation, with emphasis on the national level; constitutional basis of the system, civil rights and liberties, major branches of government, political parties, interest groups, elections, policies and policy making.

PS 211 Global Issues (3)
A systematic, interdisciplinary analysis of significant contemporary global problems, with focus on their origins, their consequences, and approaches to their resolution. Examination of these issues from the perspective of Christian social principles. Emphasis on the servant–leader growing in awareness and commitment.

PS 311 American Foreign Relations (3)
See Hist 311.

PSYCHOLOGY

Psy 101 Introduction to Psychology (3)
The course is a survey of psychology as a natural science and a social science. As a study of human behavior and the mind, the course examines current sub-areas of psychology with attention to neurology, the environment, situation and experience, and the self. Throughout the content, the course also considers how presuppositions in philosophy and theology intersect, integrate, and conflict with views on the human condition.

Psy 210 Educational Psychology (2)
See EDPS 210 Educational Psychology

Psy 211 Child Development and Psychology (2)
An in-depth study of factors influencing the development and behavior of children from conception through adolescence. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

Psy 212 Child Development and Psychology: Young Children (1)
An intense study of the preschool–age child in twelve key areas of development. Involves weekly observations of a preschool child in a childcare setting. Thirteen hours of field experience is required. Prerequisite(s): Psy 211, or take simultaneously, and sophomore standing.

Psy 221 Lifespan Development (3)
This course will address the entire range of the human life chronologically from the moment of conception through death focusing on the physical, cognitive, social and personality development of each chronological period. Basic theories, research findings, and practical applications will be discussed.

Psy 241 Child Psychology (3) 
Addresses the development of the child from conception to adolescence focusing on the physical, cognitive, social and personality development of childhood. Basic theories, research findings, and practical applications will be discussed.

Psy 290 Health Psychology (3)
See HHP 290.

Psy 295 Psychology of Exercise (3)
See HHP 295.

Psy 306 Introduction to Psychological and Social Research (3)
See Soc 306.

Psy 324 Teaching Exceptional Students (3)
This is a survey course which attempts to develop an understanding and appreciation for students with special needs. Characteristics of those with learning disabilities, physical challenges, behavioral disabilities, developmental delays, hearing and vision impairment, and giftedness are studied. Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing. Education: EDPS 210, Psychology majors: Psy 101. 12 hours of field experience is required.

Psy 341 Group Techniques (3)
A seminar–laboratory approach for the study of group work and the group process as they apply to the self, the classroom, youth work, business, and society. Prerequisite: Psy 101.

Psy 345 Social Psychology (3)
Social influences on the social and psychological development of the individual; the interaction process, role relationships, development of beliefs and attitudes, dynamics of social groups. Same as Soc 345. Prerequisite: Psy 101 or Soc 101.

Psy 385 Psychological and Sociological Analysis of Modern Literature (3)
See Eng 385.

Psy 406 Applied Research (3)
See Soc 406.

Psy 421 Adolescent Psychology and Development (2–3)
The course presents an arranged sequence of psychological and development theories, concepts, and insights designed to inform the practitioner working with adolescents. The content and class interaction cumulatively examine adolescent behavior and belief systems. The aim is to assist the practitioner with grounded yet flexible decision–making when working with young people in the contexts of counseling, teaching, youth ministry, family, and community. Prerequisite: Upper-level standing.

Psy 422 Psychology and Development of the Young Adolescent (2)
The course focuses on 10 to 15-year olds as they are beginning the transformation from childhood to adolescence. Targeted developmental areas are physical/sexual, social, spiritual, emotional, and cognitive development. Prerequisite: Psy 211 or Psy 421, or simultaneous enrollment.

Psy 442 Introduction to Counseling (3)
This introductory course is designed to assist the student to 1) reflect upon attitudes as a helping person 2) increase ability to use a problem management model 3) acquire the various skills that undergird an effort to effectively listen and respond to another person and 4) develop a personal philosophy of helping. Prerequisites: Psy 101 and upper-level standing.

Psy 445 Abnormal Psychology (3)
Reviews theories and methods which underlie the classification and study of as well as responses to abnormal behavior. Prerequisites: Psy 101 and upper-level standing.

Psy 446 Case Studies in Abnormal Psychology (1-3) 
In-depth studies of individuals who live with mental illness will be conducted using auto-biographical accounts of their lives. Students will be required to use knowledge learned in all previous psychology courses (especially Psy 445) to participate in discussions and to complete assignments. Prerequisite: Psy 445.

Psy 451 Personality Theory (3)
A study of the dynamic organizations within the human organism of those psychophysical systems that determine the individual’s unique adjustments to his/her environment. Empirical and speculatory viewpoints are studied with careful differentiation between surface and depth factors. A variety of personality theories are explored for direct applicability to the work of teacher, counselor and enabler. Prerequisites: Psy 101 and upper-level standing.

Psy 481 Practicum in Psychology (3)
The practicum in psychology is a planned and supervised educational experience which integrates the knowledge and theory of psychology gained through course work with field experience. Students reflectively observe professionals in the field and participate in meaningful and appropriate ways in the work at hand. Prerequisite: advisor’s recommendation. Upper-level standing. Students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and review the required process.

Psy 490 Capstone Seminar (3)
The capstone seminar provides students with the opportunity to integrate and apply learning from their entire college experience. Students will develop and complete a project in conjunction with the course instructor or other approved mentor. Approved projects will require students to use skills, methodology and knowledge to address important issues, explore key arguments, and critique common practices germane to their academic discipline. Internships and fieldwork experiences may also be acceptable projects. The course will also prepare students for the transition from college to graduate/professional school. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Psy 499 Psychology Honors (1)
Arranged for qualified students to conduct research, present research or to assist faculty in psychology related endeavors.

RELIGION

Rel 101 Introduction to the Bible (3)

A historical and theological survey of the Bible emphasizing the thematic unity of the Holy Scriptures fulfilled in Jesus Christ. The course prepares the student to take either Religion 121 or Religion 131 as fulfillment of the Religion General Education requirements.

Rel 120 History and Literature of the Old Testament (3)

A historical and theological survey of the Old Testament era and the Old Testament writings with an emphasis on summarizing and communicating their major themes. Offered within the Degree Completion Program only.

Rel 121 History and Literature of the Old Testament (3)

A historical and theological survey of the Old Testament era and the Old Testament writings with an emphasis on summarizing and communicating their major themes.

Rel 130 History and Literature of the New Testament (3)

A historical and theological survey of the New Testament era and the New Testament writings with an emphasis on summarizing and communicating their major themes. Offered within the Degree Completion Program only.

Rel 131 History and Literature of the New Testament (3)

A historical and theological survey of the New Testament era and the New Testament writings with an emphasis on summarizing and communicating their major themes.

Rel 220 Faith, Life and Nursing (3)

This course examines the implications of Lutheran Christian theology for an understanding of vocation at both the personal and corporate levels to develop nursing professionals as ethical decision makers. The emphasis of the course is on the application to life of biblically based Lutheran theology. Integration of biblical ethics into personal and professional decision making with an emphasis on nursing practice.

ROTC

Most ROTC courses are held on UNL’s main campus in Lincoln. Registration with UNL is required. Please check with the Registrar’s Office.

AERO 185/185L Foundation of the United States Air Force I/Leadership Lab (1/0 cr)
Officership, communication skills, opportunities, and benefits in today’s U.S. Air Force. A weekly one and one-half hour Leadership Lab consists of Air Force customs and courtesies, Air Force environment, drill and ceremonies.

AERO 186/186L Foundation of the United States Air Force II/Leadership Lab (1/0 cr) Communication and leadership skills, US Military history, and the organizational structure of today’s US Air Force. A weekly one and one-half hour Leadership Lab consists of Air Force customs and courtesies, Air Force environment, drill and ceremonies.

AERO 295/295L The Evolution of US Air and Space Power I/Leadership Lab (1/0 cr) Prerequisite: AERO 186 or permission. History of the development and deployment of airpower from the Wright Brothers’ first flight to the Persian Gulf War and how the events were affected by technology, politics, doctrine, and geography. Emphasizes U.S .airpower. Lab introduces cadet leadership training with practical experience.

AERO 296/296L The Evolution of US Air and Space Power II/Leadership Lab (1/0 cr) Prerequisite: AERO 295 or permission. History of the development and deployment of airpower from the Wright Brothers' first flight to the Persian Gulf War and how the events were affected by technology, politics, doctrine and geography. Emphasizes US airpower. Lab continues activities of 295L.

AERO–331/331L Air Force Leadership Studies I/Leadership Lab (3/0 cr)
Prerequisite: Permission of professor of aerospace studies. Communications skills, leadership, quality initiatives, and human relations. Requires cadet research and participation in the instructional process. Lab includes practical application of the principles of leadership in the operation and administration of the cadet wing.

AERO 332/332L Air Force Leadership Studies II/Leadership Lab (3/0 cr)
Prerequisite: AERO 331, or permission of professor of aerospace studies. Principles of leadership, professionalism, ethics, communications skills, and problem solving, including quality leadership applications. Lab continues activities of 331L.

AERO 441/441L National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty I/Leadership Lab (3/0 cr)
Prerequisite: AERO 331, 332, or permission of professor of aerospace studies. Environment in which defense policy is formulated. Requisites for maintaining adequate national security forces; political, economic, and social constraints of the national defense structure; and the overall defense policymaking process. Lab continues activities of 332L.

AERO 442/442L National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active Duty II/Leadership Lab (3/0 cr)
Prerequisite: AERO 331, 332, and 441 or permission of professor of aerospace studies. The armed forces as an integral element of society; the broad range of civil–military relations. The role of the professional officer in a democratic society, the socialization process within the armed services, and the military justice system. Lab continues activities of 441L

MLSC 101/101L Foundations of Officership/ Leadership Lab I (1/0 cr)
Issues and competencies central to a commissioned officer’s responsibilities. Understanding officership, leadership, Army values and life skills, such as physical fitness and time management. Lab includes challenging, rewarding, and practical activities in military skill development.

MLSC 102/102L Basic Leadership/Leadership Lab II (1/0 cr)
Foundations of leadership: problem solving, communications, military briefings, effective writing, goal setting, physical well– being, techniques for improving listening and speaking skills and counseling. Lab continues activities of Lab I.

MLSC 201/201L Individual Leadership Studies/Leadership Lab III (2/0 cr)
Introduction to replicating successful leadership characteristics through observations during experiential learning exercises. Record characteristics, discuss them in small group settings and use them in subsequent activities. Practice communications skills necessary for leadership roles, especially in military environments. Lab parallels Lab I with possible leadership roles within the Cadet Corps.

MLSC 202/202L Leadership and Teamwork/Leadership Lab IV (2/0 cr)
Building successful teams, methods to influence group actions, effective communications within groups, creativity in problem solving and how to motivate subordinates and peers. Using these skills in the context of military environments, such as while performing land navigation and infantry tactics. Lab continues activities of Lab III.

MLSC 301/301L Leadership and Problem Solving/Leadership Lab V (3/0 cr)
Conduct self-assessments of leadership style, develop a personal fitness regimen, and plan and conduct individual/small unit tactical training, while testing reasoning and problem solving techniques. Direct feedback on leadership abilities. Lab includes leadership positions in the cadet corps, tactics and weapons training, preparation for final year.

MLSC 302/302L Leadership and Ethics/Leadership Lab VI (3/0 cr)
Role of communications, values and ethics in effective leadership. Ethical decision making, consideration of others, spirituality in the military and Army leadership doctrine. Improve oral and written communication abilities. Lab continues activities of Lab V.

MLSC 401/401L Leadership and Management/Leadership Lab VII (3/0 cr)
Proficiencies in planning and executing complex operations, functioning as a member of a staff and mentoring subordinates. Training management, methods of effective staff collaboration, and developmental counseling techniques. Lab includes practice through developing, planning, and conducting leadership labs.

MLSC 402/402L Officership/Leadership Lab VIII (3/0 cr)
Case study analysis of military law and practical exercises in establishing an ethical command climate. Complete a semester– long Senior Leadership Project that requires: plan, organize, collaborate, analyze and demonstrate leadership skills. Lab continues activities of Lab VII.

SCIENCE

Sci 202 Science of Everyday Things (2)
Lecture 1, Lab. 2. Study of the science of everyday things with special use of particle and wave models. Understanding and explaining a wide variety of common phenomena in our lives; weather, household items, color effects, radio, TV, electricity, athletics, heating and cooling, etc. Prerequisites: H.S. biology, chemistry, and physics or equivalent.

Sci 230 Introduction to Forensic Science – Lecture (3)
Lecture 3. See Bio 230.

Sci 231 Introduction to Forensic Science – Lab (1)
Lab. 2. See Bio 231.

Sci 281 Physical Geography and Geology (4)
Lecture 3, Lab. 2. See Geog 281.

Sci 315 Environmental Science (3)
See Geog 315.

Sci 331 Descriptive Astronomy (3)
Introductory study of what is known about the universe and how this knowledge is gained. Prerequisite: H.S. physics or equivalent. Same as Phys 331.

Sci 351 Classroom Activities in Physical Science (3)
Lecture I, Lab. 4. Practical guidance and experience in the planning, preparation and execution of educational activities in introductory physical science, chemistry and physics. Useful for all levels with special emphasis on grades 7–12. Same as Phys 351.

Sci 365 Science and Society (1)
Lectures and periodical readings on recent and current science topics of interest to the “layman.” Science topics chosen for their impact on the individual and on society. Moral and religious implications of ideas and scientific advances are explored. P/F.

Sci 381 Meteorology and Oceanography (3)
See Geog 381.

Sci 385 Introduction to GPS (3)
See Geog 385.

SERVICE LEARNING

SL 370 Leadership Lab (2)
Students explore the personal challenges and opportunities of being leaders in action. Students will discover their interpersonal, organizational, and personal development skills and strengths. Activities, assignments, and readings focus on leadership theory and practical applications. Students will execute and reflect on a leadership focused service–learning project they have proposed and developed through the S–L Resource Center. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, declared major, approved proposal, and instructor permission are required.

SL 380 Special Topics (2–3)
Special course developed and offered to explore interdisciplinary or advanced program connections to particular community issue or need led by faculty members with interest and experience in the special topic area. Course title and credits will vary per department focus, course objectives, and depth of service–learning experience. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, declared major, and permission of instructor are required.

SL 390 Self-directed Study (2)
Student engages in a self-directed exploration of a particular community issue or need relevant to their major or area of study. Student will develop a service–learning project proposal working with the S–L Resource Center and will then work directly with a service–learning faculty member on specific readings and other assignments to meet course objectives and student learning goals. Prerequisites: junior or senior standing, declared major, and approved proposal are required.

SOCIAL WORK

SW 201 Introduction to Social Work (3)
An orientation to the field and profession of social work, with emphasis on the role of the social workers. Historical and theoretical perspectives are examined, along with current trends and issues facing the profession.

SW 311 Social Work Internship I (3)
Supervised instruction to acquire skills in social work practice and to test in a field setting social work principles and practices. Students spend approximately 135 hours during the semester in this experience. Prerequisite: SW 201. Students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and review the required process.

SW 312 Social Work Internship II (3)
A continuation of SW 311, with approximately 135 hours of supervised field experience. Prerequisite: SW 311. Students should contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and review the required process.

SOCIOLOGY

Soc 101 Introduction to Sociology (3)
Systematic analysis of culture, society, socialization, social control, social processes, and social institutions.

Soc 201 Cultural Anthropology (3)
A survey of cultural anthropology with emphasis on culture, cultural diversity, social structure, social system components, language and communication, socio-linguistics, social control, and cultural change.

Soc 221 Social Problems (3)
Examines major social issues in America society, problems of the young and the elderly, alienation, deviant behavior, ecological problems, bureaucratic structure vis-a-vis individual freedom, and social disorganization. Prerequisite: Soc 101.

Soc 306 Introduction to Psychological and Social Research (3)
This course is an introduction to the philosophy, values, methodology, and objectives of psychological and social research. The main objective of this course is for the student to successfully complete a viable research proposal. Considerable emphasis is given to the following: use of the scientific method in social research; selection of a research problem; review of related literature and theories; structure of a research proposal; descriptive methods; instrument development; experimental methods; and applied research. Prerequisite: Soc 101 or Psy 101; Math 122; Junior standing. Same as Psy 306

Soc 312 Urban Sociology (3)
The structure, functioning, and traits of urban society. Urban growth, ecology, culture problems and planning. Prerequisite: Soc 101.

Soc 321 Criminology (3)
This course examines the theories, causes and different responses to crime. It examines crime in the U.S. and other countries from juvenile to adult crime and differences between males and females in addition to what is even considered crime. 

Soc 322 Criminal Justice (3)
This is an introductory class to the study of criminal justice. Students will be introduced to the history of the American Criminal Justice system and its primary components: law enforcement, courts, corrections, police work, types of crime and responses to crime. Prerequisite: Soc 101.

Soc/CJ 325 Topics in Criminal Justice/Criminology (3)
This class is designed to offer variable topics in the field of criminology or criminal justice. Topics will go in depth on a particular topic to expand knowledge and skill in this specific area. Further description will be given for individual topics. This class may be repeated with different topics. 

Soc 331 The Family (3)
The family as a basic social institution with special references to changing family structure and function. Special attention is given to changing social roles of family members and their impact upon other institutions such as the school and the church. Sem. I only. Prerequisite: Soc 101.

Soc 333 Social Gerontology (3)
This course is a basic introduction of social issues and theories of the aging process. Emphasis is given to the biological and psychological aspects as well as self-awareness of aging. Prerequisite: Soc 101.

Soc 335 Sociology of Religion (3)
Analyzes sociological theories pertaining to religion. Studies research data regarding the structure of and function of religious practices and institutions, including the influences of cultural factors upon religious systems. Prerequisite: Soc 101 or permission of instructor.

Soc 345 Social Psychology (3)
Social influences on the social and psychological development of the individual; the interaction process, role relationships, development of beliefs and attitudes, dynamics of social groups. Same as Psy 345. Prerequisite: Soc 101 or Psy 101.

Soc 361 Social Theory (3)
An intensive examination of selected major social theories and theorists and an introduction to the fundamentals of theory building and the evaluation of theories in the social sciences. Prerequisite: Soc 101.

Soc 406 Applied Research (3)
This seminar is designed to integrate the student’s past course work in psychology and sociology in an effort to focus specifically on a current social problem or issue. The main objective of this course is for the student to successfully complete a research project based on the research proposal developed in Psy/Soc 306. Considerable emphasis is given to the following: structure of a research report; data collection; data analysis; data interpretation; contribution to or support of related literature and theories; and presentation and publication of findings. Prerequisite: Psychology and/or Behavioral Science Major; successful completion (grade of C or higher) of Psy/Soc 306. Same as Psy 406.

Soc 417 Afro–American History (3)
May be taken as a sociology elective. See Hist 417.

Soc 481 Practicum in Sociology (3)
The practicum in sociology is a planned and supervised educational experience which integrates the knowledge and theory of sociology gained through course work with field experience. Students observe professionals in the field and participate as determined between the supervisor of that organization and the student. Students must contact the Office of Career Services to obtain the undergraduate internship/practicum packet and complete the required process. Prerequisite: Upper level standing.

Soc 490 Capstone Seminar (3)
The capstone seminar provides students with the opportunity to integrate and apply learning from their entire college experience. Students will develop and complete a project in conjunction with the course instructor or other approved mentor. Approved projects will require students to use skills, methodology and knowledge to address important issues, explore key arguments, and critique common practices germane to their academic discipline. Internships and fieldwork experiences may also be acceptable projects. The course will also prepare students for the transition from college to graduate/professional school. Prerequisite: Senior standing.

Soc 499 Honors Course
Arranged for qualified seniors.

SPANISH

Span 101 Beginning Spanish I (3)
Aural–oral aspect of the language. Fundamentals of grammar with practice in reading and writing. Ordinarily not open to students having had more than one year of high school Spanish.

Span 102 Beginning Spanish II (3)
A continuation of Spanish I with increased emphasis upon speaking, reading, and writing skills. Prerequisite: Span 101 or equivalent.

Span 201 Intermediate Spanish I (3)
A systematic review of Spanish grammar. Development of writing and speaking skills. Study of selected aspects of Hispanic culture and society through reading and discussion. Prerequisite: Span 102 or equivalent.

Span 202 Intermediate Spanish II (3)
A continuation of topics and skills studied in Span 201. Reading and discussion of Spanish and Latin American literature and contemporary writings. Prerequisite: Span 201 or equivalent.

Span 203 Intensive Conversation (3)
A course in intensive conversation in Spanish, supported by study of vocabulary, reading, grammar review, and discussion and presentations in class on selected themes. Prerequisite: Span 202 or permission of instructor.

Span 204 Intensive Composition (3)
An intensive composition course in Spanish supported by a review of grammar, vocabulary study, reading, and in-class conversation. Prerequisite: Span 202 or permission of instructor.

Span 305 Advanced Spanish Grammar and Communication (3)
A course focusing on advanced grammatical features of Spanish. Emphasis also placed on utilizing the topics of study in conversation and other interactive activities. Prerequisite: Span 203 or 304 or permission of the instructor. 

Span 321 Spanish Civilization and Culture (3)
This course explores the history, culture and civilization of Spain. Prerequisite: Span 202.

Span 331 Latin American Culture (3)
A historical examination of the development of Latin American societies along with a study of major cultural characteristics of modern Latin American societies. The course is taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Span 202 or above.

Span 341 Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3)
An introductory reading course in literature (short story, poetry, novel) of Spanish–speaking countries. Prerequisite: Span 203 and 204 or permission of instructor.

Span 342 Introduction to the Analysis of Hispanic Literature (3)
An introduction to the analysis of literature (narrative, poetry, drama) of Spanish–speaking countries. Prerequisite: Span 341 or permission of instructor.

Span 399 Independent Study (1–6)
Topic or program hours by arrangement.

THEOLOGY

Theo 209 Faith and Life (3)
This course examines the implications of Lutheran Christian theology for an understanding of vocation at both the personal and corporate levels. The emphasis of the course is on the application to life of biblically based Lutheran theology. Topics to be explored will include, but will not be limited to: a survey of the Reformation era, the proper distinction between Law and Gospel, two-kingdoms theology, the priesthood of all believers, vocation, stewardship, ethics, and select contemporary issues in Christian theology. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the Biblical Literacy component of General Education. Offered within the Degree Completion Program only.

Theo 210 Faith and Life (3)
This course examines the implications of Lutheran Christian theology for an understanding of vocation at both the personal and corporate levels. The emphasis of the course is on the application to life of biblically based Lutheran theology. Topics to be explored will include, but will not be limited to: a survey of the Reformation era, the proper distinction between Law and Gospel, two-kingdoms theology, the priesthood of all believers, vocation, stewardship, ethics, and select contemporary issues in Christian theology. Prerequisites: Fulfillment of the Biblical Literacy component of General Education.

Theo 241 Interpretation of Selected Old Testament Prophetical Books (3)
Particular attention is given to developing interpretative skills and preparing devotions. This course focuses attention on selected Old Testament prophetical books. Prerequisite: Rel 121.

Theo 242 Interpretation of Selected Psalms (3)
Particular attention is given to developing interpretative skills and preparing devotions. This course focuses attention on selected Psalms. Prerequisite: Rel 121.

Theo 251 Interpretation of Selected Pauline Epistles (3)
Particular attention is given to developing interpretative skills and preparing devotions. This course focuses attention on selected Pauline Epistles. Prerequisite: Rel 131.

Theo 252 Interpretation of the Gospels (3)
Particular attention is given to developing interpretative skills and preparing devotions. This course focuses attention on the Gospels. Prerequisite: Rel 131.

Theo 331 Studies in the Life of Christ (3)
The setting, activity, significance, and evaluation of the person and work of Jesus on the basis of Scripture, historical literature, and recent scholarship. Prerequisite: Rel 131.

Theo 333 Devotion to Christ (3)
This course will expose the student to historical developments within the Lutheran tradition and current cultural movements in the US which impact one’s devotional life in Christ.  This is an interdisciplinary and practical approach to understanding, developing and practicing devotion to Christ.  The student will also serve others by leading them in a maturing devotional life. Prerequisites: Theo 210 and upper-level standing.

Theo 361 Christian Doctrine I (3)
This course examines Lutheran doctrine and applies it to the work, worship, and life of the Christian community. The topics are the nature and authority of Scripture, the nature of God, creation, the nature of man under grace and law, and the person and the work of Christ. Prerequisites: Theo 241 or 242 or 251 or 252 and upper-level standing.

Theo 362 Christian Doctrine II (3)
This course examines Lutheran doctrine and applies it to the work, worship, and life of the Christian community. The topics are the Church’s mission and ministry, the means of grace (Word and Sacraments), the person and work of the Holy Spirit, justification, the Church, Christian living, predestination, and eschatology. Prerequisites: upper-level standing; Theo 361 or permission of chairman.

Theo 363 The Lutheran Confessions (3)
As examination of the evangelical, ecumenical, theological, and practical content of the Book of Concord through an exploration of the Three Ecumenical Creeds, the Augsburg Confession and Apology, and the Formula of Concord.

Theo 371 History of Christian Thought (3)
A study of major events and controversies in Western Christianity. The creeds, teachings which resulted, and the personalities which significantly influenced the formation of Christian thought are studied on the basis of original texts in translation.

Theo 375 Christian Denominations and Religious Movements (3) 
This course is a comparative study of the major Christian denominations and religious movements which focuses on Biblical, religious, and theological emphases, organizational polity, cultural and historical backgrounds, and analyzes these aspects and contributions to ethnicities, cultures, religion and social dynamics within the world. 

Theo 381 Christian Teacher’s Ministry (2)
The course applies Biblical and theological principles of vocation, ministry, and the two kingdoms to the teacher of the church and the priesthood of all believers. Study of Scripture, standard historical documents, and current practice in calling, placement, and congregational life focuses on the identity of the teaching minister in parochial education and the Christian teaching in public and private education.

Theo 382 Theology of Corporate Worship (3)
The shaping of a theology of corporate worship on the basis of the Scriptures and the Lutheran Confessions, with particular reference to criteria for creating and evaluating worship forms in the church today.

Theo 385 Parish Visitation and Evangelism (3)
The Theology of the Church’s mission and the practice of visitation and evangelism ministries within the setting of a parish are the focus of this course. Methods of visitation and programs and techniques of personal evangelism will be explored. Skills in speaking the Gospel will be developed.

Theo 390 World Religions: The Gospel in a Pluralistic World (3)
A survey of major world religions, highlighting their origins, history and worldview, and assessing the impact of each upon world culture. Prerequisites: Rel 121 and 131.

Theo 399 Independent Study in Evangelism Visitation (1)
Designed for those who will train lay people in evangelism calling. The student will attend a parish’s evangelism calls training class and participate with other members in weekly calls. P/F.

Theo 418 From Exile to Christ: A Study of the Political and Theological Development in Judaism during the Intertestamental Period (3)
This course is an historical study of the Palestinian Judaism from the post–exilic period to the birth of Christ with extensive reading in intertestamental documents (Apocrypha, Dead Sea Scrolls, rabbinic sayings), noting those theological developments which prepare for the New Testament.

Theo 450 Understanding and Teaching the Bible (3)
This course gives attention to the role of the Bible in faith formation, hermeneutical principles, ways of teaching the Bible, Bible study programs, small group study, resources, and ways of promoting personal, family, and congregational involvement with the Bible. Prerequisites: Rel 121 and 131 and one of the following: Theo 241, 242, 251, 252, and upper-level standing.

Theo 460 Factors in Congregational Growth (3)
An examination of Biblical and confessional perspectives on congregational growth. Sociological factors will also be considered. Emphasis will be placed on equipping the student to determine appropriate programs of outreach for a parish.

Theo 465 Christian Ethics (3)
A study of the relationship between Christian ethics and moral philosophy. Students explore the ethical standards involved in Christianity and apply them to contemporary personal and social problems.

Theo 482 Nurturing Faith through Family, School and Congregation (3)
A study the formation of faith and virtue based on Biblical, theological and psychological perspectives serves as the foundation for investigating ways in which the family, congregation and the schools of the church can nurture the faith of children, youth and adults.

Theo 483 Sexuality and the Family (3)
This course develops a Christian approach to human sexuality, marriage, and the family through a study of the pertinent Biblical material. Special attention is given to developing skills, attitudes, and knowledge which can be incorporated in the Christian education programs of congregations, schools and social agencies.

Theo 485 Family Life Ministry (3)
A study of various models and strategies useful for initiating and sustaining a ministry to families in the context of a local parish. Emphasis will be placed upon family life ministry programs, evaluating curricula designed to be used in family life ministry, and family enrichment experiences.

Theo 487 Planning Adult Education in the Parish (3)
In planning educational events for adults, this course gives attention to ways of teaching for faith, adults as learners, the ministry of the laity, the design of educational programs, and curricula. Prerequisite: Upper-level standing.

Theo 489 Ministry in a Changing World (3)
This course analyzes and evaluates selected societal issues, examining and assessing how Christians as the Church are responding or might respond to them. Using theological foundations of Law and Gospel, the student will reflect thoughtfully on the character of Christian discipleship in the contemporary world and examine and refine his or her understanding of individual and corporate ministry. This course does not seek to impose ready-made answers to the issues studied, but to stimulate questions and serious reflection on the character of Christian discipleship in the face of significant social issues in today’s global community. Prerequisites:  Rel 121 and 131; Theo 210. 

Theo 499 Honors Course
Arranged for qualified seniors.