News & Events at Concordia

"Between Surface and Time" Exhibit Commemorates Concordia's 125th Anniversary

Friday, Oct. 26, 2018
Two Emeriti professors will display their representations of liturgical art at the Marxhausen Gallery from Oct. 28 through Dec. 12.
Two Emeriti professors will display their representations of liturgical art at the Marxhausen Gallery from Oct. 28 through Dec. 12.

Concordia will host the exhibit, “Between Surface and Time,” celebrating the art and ministry of Emeriti Professors William Wolfram and Richard Wiegmann. It will be available for viewing at the Marxhausen Gallery of Art on Concordia’s campus from Oct. 28 through Dec. 12.

A reception will be held from 1-4 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 11, in the Marxhausen Gallery of Art. There will also be a gallery talk with the artists and a special raffle drawing at 2 p.m.

A selection of Wolfram’s digital drawings, paintings and liturgical art is paired with forty print editions created by Wiegmann during his service at Concordia. In presenting these two artists, the exhibition highlights Concordia's deep visual art tradition that has shaped more than a half century of art students. 

“These two professors were not only influential instructors, but they were also role models,” says James Bockelman, professor of art and director of the Marxhausen Gallery. “They demonstrated what it meant to be practicing artists and they’ve given us a terrific show to share with our community.”

Wolfram's contribution to this exhibit is a survey of material manipulation in oil, acrylic, modeling paste, assemblage or computer generated images. The overarching themes of Wolfram’s work, such as craftsmanship, surface treatment and abstraction to embody meaning, all relate to the liturgical nature of art, in which the procedure is connected to ritual and the commonplace is consecrated for new service.

The art of Richard Wiegmann's is marked by a versatile assortment of print technologies including etching, serigraphy, woodcut, embossing and mixed media. Much of his imagery is lifted from scripture and his regard for the natural world. Many of his prints function as visual hymns. In addition, Wiegmann reminds us of the interconnectivity of time and space, lodging his theme between the fossil record and the shape–shifting tide pool.

Since 2000, the Marxhausen Gallery of Art has hosted more than 30 artists and arts professionals. Through a diverse mix of exhibitions, performances, screenings, and conversations, the visiting artist program provides a public forum for the presentation and contemplation of contemporary art, curatorial practice and scholarship. Through discourse, studio critiques, informal discussions and public lectures the program provides students with direct access to arts professionals working across disciplines.

The exhibit is open to the public and free of charge. Wolfram has donated two digital cross prints as part of a raffle, which can be registered for in the Marxhausen Gallery from Oct. 28 to Nov. 11, or by emailing James Bockelman. A number of etchings and serigraphs by Wiegmann will be for sale as well. All proceeds will go the the gallery’s fund for new print acquisitions.

The Marxhausen Gallery is located in Jesse Hall and is open 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday–Friday and 1-4 p.m., Saturday and Sunday while classes are in session. The Gallery is closed for Thanksgiving recess from Nov. 17-25.